Category Archives: Commentary

Create, create, create

I was having a kind of blah Sunday.

Nothing wrong, but not inspired….just blah.

Then I found the work of artist Mel Bochner online. Look at what he was able to create around the very same idea —

blah

 
Now, that’s inspiring!

(So is the rest of his portfolio. Check it out.)

Missing Who

I’m watching the season premiere of Doctor Who on BBC America.

Of course, it’s not just a new season, but an entirely new doctor — Scottish actor Peter Capaldi now portrays the regenerated Doctor Who, replacing the very beloved Matt Smith.

Peter-Capaldi-Doctor-Who-Time-of-the-Doctormatt smith doctor who

 

 

 

So far companion Clara is having trouble accepting the ‘update’…and I have to admit, so am I.

I started watching the series with Matt at the helm.  While I’ve seen clips from past shows and different doctors — and think I would have enjoyed David Tennant’s take on the role –

I don’t want another doctor.

Of course, it’s been less than one episode. I know on an intellectual level that Capaldi will make the role his own, and, with time, I’ll probably be on board. Still…

Change is so hard.

 

When Wallace Met Chandry

It’s no accident that the movie poster for What If places good friends Wallace and Chandry at a diner.

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The film is clearly trying to be the When Harry Met Sally for this generation…and does a decent job.

Daniel Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan are quirky and appealing, their friendship believable,  their banter quick and smart.

She has a boyfriend (who made me laugh), and Daniel has emotional baggage — plus best friend Adam Driver of Girls who has huge energy…and is huge standing next to Daniel (which is pretty funny right there).

This is a rom-com, so there are misunderstandings, yearning, romantic postcards (in this day and age), implusive international flights, fist fights, and at least two weddings — babies, too.

What if that stuff still worked in films?

You know — it kinda does.

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You know who you are

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A matter of taste

ChaCha.com recently put together a list of some of the most unique fast foods available around the globe.

spam and egg sandwichThis was of particular interest to me because a couple of their choices were from Japan:  McDonald’s Ebi-Fillet — that’s shrimp — and Burger King’s Spam and Egg Sandwich (pictured on the left).

I’m proud to say I didn’t frequent any fast food restaurants during my stay, so I didn’t notice these options.

What did strike me as slightly odd was the traditional breakfast in Japan:

ricesaladgreen tea

White rice. A green salad. A thin, bland yogurt. And green tea.

Now, I might eat this for lunch if my main meal was delivered to the wrong table, but it’s not the flavor profile that I crave for breakfast. But my hotel offered it, and I ate it.  When in Rome…

(I did break down and add sweetener to the tea.  And to their credit, the natives didn’t wince too hard when I did.)

Star gazing

This morning was grey and rainy, so I decided to go see Guardians of the Galaxy.

Guardians-of-the-GalaxyI didn’t think the trailer looked that interesting, but all the critics were singing its praises…and a few friends who attended the first showings loved it, too.

So, off I went.

If you love Chris Pratt from Parks and Recreation and have been on the fence, go see it.  This is a superhero film infused with his trademark sense of humor.

Bradley Cooper is also hilarious as the voice of the raccoon.  And the talking tree, who can only speak four words, will become a favorite.

I have to admit, though, one of the most gut-wrenching movie moments in the theater today was seeing the trailer for Interstellar for the first time.

Wow.

Schooled

kidnapped for christIf you subscribe to Showtime, I encourage you to watch the documentary Kidnapped for Christ, currently available OnDemand.

The film centers on a Christian boarding school in the Dominican Republic that advertised itself as a rehab center for troubled US teens.  The filmmaker, an evangelical school student, was allowed complete access to the teens there and, during production, uncovers disturbing information about the school’s “behavior modification program.” She also learns that some students had been kidnapped from their homes with their parents’ full knowledge and permission.

Her commitment to the project eventually morphs into a determination to help these abused teenagers — one in particular who wants to leave the school where he is essentially being held prisoner.

This story is heartbreaking and, I learned, just one case among thousands around the world.

It is a must-see.