Category Archives: Health

Not so quiet

My bucolic beach vacation received a jolt yesterday when I got up close and personal with a stingray.

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I was walking in kneedeep water, so I  didn’t see my attacker coming. But once I felt the stab, I did get a hand on him to pull him away.

It bled a bit, but hurt a lot. For three or four hours, it was pretty darn intense. Then it calmed down.

And so did I.

For future reference, should you be so unlucky, don’t pee on the wound. And don’t rush to the doctor  (although painkillers will be tempting).

Just make sure no barb remains, soak it in hot water, apply antibiotic ointment and leave it uncovered to heal. Elevating it seems to help, too.

And be grateful for friends and family who quickly gather round to help.

When only one word will do

This was a crappy day.

I woke up to a vomiting dog. He’s feeling much better now, but it took a $400 vet visit to do the job.

My to-do list was repeatedly stymied by frustrating people and annoying road blocks.

And my evening dog walk, usually my stress reducer, was washed out — literally — by a cloud burst that left me and Rory sopping wet.

Yep, crappy was the word of the day. So this video really spoke to me.

…and puts a smile on my face! Great way to put this day to bed and start fresh tomorrow.

Carry a big stick

I have never followed an intense exercise routine.

I am a big believer in ‘all things in moderation’ — in both food and physical activity.

But I have recently been inspired to follow a new upper-body strength routine that I think could catch on around the globe:

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Donald Trump Pinata Challenge

1. Buy pinata in likeness of annoyingly-ignorant businessman and Republican presidential candidate.

2. Get really big stick.

3. Beat the crap out of that thang, honing upper body strength while reducing frustrations with Trump and flawed political process.

4. Repeat 2-3 times each week.

Note: if you put candy in pinata per tradition, this could reduce positive outcomes of routine.

Ringside seats

I’ve never gotten involved in the online debate about whether or not to vaccinate children. Since I don’t have kids, I figured I would stay out of that fight (although I vaccinate my dog, so we can probably guess where I might land).

I have to wonder, though, if this TV commercial is making the back-and-forth even more heated…

Not only vaccinate your kids but re-vaccinate in their teens? The anti-vax crowd must be foaming at the mouth. But the ad’s emotional argument is effective.

Once again — staying out of it.

A weighty subject

When you go to the lady doctor for your yearly poke-and-prod, some tests aren’t so yearly anymore.

Depending on your age and family history, your physician may recommend a Pap smear, for example, every two years… or a mammogram only after age 40.

(My family history is so checkered, I get to do these type of tests every year, but I’ve heard rumors.)

The other thing you have to do every time you walk in a doctor’s office is a weight check. This I feel should change.

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The nurse usually takes my weight, after consulting my chart. Unless I appear to have ballooned to an obese level, I don’t feel this is a necessary measure. It’s not the way I want to start the conversation, either…

Unless the nurse takes his/her weight, too. Then we have something to discuss.

Eating healthy

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This is a cake that looks like veggies.

That totally counts.

Armchair quarterback

One of the first things I saw on television this morning was the commercial featuring “Mr. Hyperbole” Terry Bradshaw promoting the vaccine for shingles:

Since I have had the misfortune to have shingles twice at an unusually young age, I feel like I need to speak up — to confirm that what he’s saying is true (because his style of delivery can sometimes appear false).

Shingles is a bitch, pure and simple.

You have a horrible, itchy rash on your skin, just as Terry described.  But what makes it 10 times worse is that the pain runs far deeper.  It’s like your internal organs are on fire, and your muscles ache — all at the same time.  And you have the rash to deal with, too.

Quite simply, you are miserable.

I had my first case of shingles in my 20’s on my back, which is a fairly classic presentation.  It made breathing almost impossible. In my early 40’s, it reappeared on my shin, which is so unusual, it took ER doctors two days and a ridiculous amount of testing to diagnose.  I had phantom leg pain from that case of shingles for almost two years.

I wouldn’t wish shingles on my worse enemy, so if your doctor recommends the vaccine, give it serious consideration.

Terry and I aren’t lying.