Tag Archives: commentary

Late to the party

Dear Ray Rahman:

Thanks for writing your article in Entertainment Weekly encouraging viewers to watch ‘The Late Late Show’ on CBS.

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Since my fav Craig Ferguson left in mid-December, the show has been hosted by a revolving cast of characters, giving — as you put it — the sense that ‘anything can happen.’

Where have you been, Ray?

For a decade,  Craig Ferguson embodied anything-goes television. His goal was to deconstruct the late night genre,  so his shows were always unscripted, unruly and universally  hilarious.

A gay robot skeleton as a sidekick? A dancing horse with his own on-set stall? Real, honest-to-god conversations with guests?

I’m just sorry you missed all the fun.

Golden moments

I am looking forward to tonight’s Oscar broadcast for three reasons.

oscars_2015_nph1. Neil Patrick Harris.

2. This awards season desperately needs a surprise winner. In any category.

Please, Academy, be the organization that flabbergasts me with a shocking turn of events, shaking me out of this year’s numbing sameness.

3. Much like the Super Bowl, the Oscars commercials are increasingly becoming an event unto themselves. I am particularly excited to see a new ad by Stonyfield Yogurt,  where woman actually admit to not liking Greek yogurt.

I knew I wasn’t the only one out there.

Here’s a sneak peek:

Honesty and innuendo?  Sign me up!

 

A pat on the back

Hey, Time Warner Cable — mark the date on your calendar!  Someone (me) is giving you positive feedback.

(I’m as shocked as you are.)

alphabetTWC recently changed the way they order their listings in the on-screen program guide.

In the past, they listed all movies and TV shows that began with ‘The’ under ‘T’…which is stupid.  You might miss a program altogether if you forget that all important article tacked on the front of the title.

But recently — I’m not sure how recently, but I watch a lot of TV, so I’m guessin’ it hasn’t been that long ago — they changed their policy.  Now a movie like ‘The Last Five Years’ (which opens in theaters and OnDemand today) is listed under the letter ‘L.’

How groundbreaking. How logical.  How unlike Time Warner Cable.

Let’s hear it for common sense!

 

Twitter etiquette

When Teddy Kennedy died back in August 2009, I was surprised to learn the news via Twitter instead of more traditional news sources.

Today, Twitter breaks most big stories.

bob simonFor instance, legendary CBS News reporter and 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon was killed yesterday in an automobile accident in my neighborhood, yet I still heard about it on Twitter.

Then celebrities from all walks of life began making their statements of sympathy.

On Twitter.

Yet another development many a publicist and PR maven probably didn’t see coming down the information superhighway.

All those carefully worded press releases and statements of sympathy and support that once earned them an extra billable hour or six?  Gone.  Because now their clients can take to Twitter and, in 140 typo- and emoji-filled characters, sum up their feelings about the dearly departed.

And start a Twitter sh#t storm at the same time.

Ya gotta listen

My boyfriend  and I just had a very spirited debate about ‘NPR voice’ — that deliberate monitone their radio announcers wear as a badge of honor, a nasal symbol of the inherent quality of their content.

He denies its very existence.

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It’s all that I can hear.

So I was cheered to read about a woman annoyed by a similar condition —

Poet’s voice

She makes a strong case. Check out her video proof.

Videos — yeah, that’s what I need…

City chick

‘The big, bad city’ — Manhattan has been been hit with this label from time to time.

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But the more I watch shows like Pretty Little Liars, the more I’m convinced the suburbs are the real danger zone.

Those big backyards where murders are plotted and carried out, and bodies buried. Ginormous homes where secret assignations are simple because there is so much space.  And parks that serve as conveniently creepy venues for the local lunatic to hunt you down.

Times Square?  Piece of cake.

See this

Last night Julianne Moore won a SAG Award for her work in Still Alice.

still aliceI saw the movie on Sunday, so I know why.

Her portrayal of a 50-year old Columbia University professor with early on-set Alzheimer’s is amazing…because you can’t see what she’s doing.

She simply has Alzheimer’s.

And everyone around her in the movie looks like they’re acting.

In the movie scene represented by the still above, Julianne’s character is out running in her New York City neighborhood, and is suddenly lost.  She starts to hyperventilate, and everything becomes an unrecognizable blur. The audience is in there with her.

It’s really scary.

I won’t pretend this movie is easy to watch, but I think it’s important to see.