Tag Archives: live tweeting

Snarktastic

Yesterday I was miffed at snarky comments on Twitter and Facebook made by NYC locals who were underwhelmed by Hurricane Irene.

I wasn’t the only one.

Neighbors in New Jersey, Connecticut and Vermont who are underwater and without power were quick to snark back at their lack of empathy.

The snark resurfaced last night in live tweets about the VMAs, one of the few awards shows I don’t watch (but probably should based on the comments).

Which got me thinking… where does the word ‘snark’ come from?  How long has it been around?  And is there someone I can personally thank since it is so much fun to say?

‘Snark’ is simply the blending of ‘snide’ and ‘remark.’ I couldn’t find a date or person credited for the first mash-up of the word, but it’s a good one.

I did find lots of ‘snark’ derivations, which are brilliant in and of themselves.  I know you’ll want to add a few of them to your vocab:

  • snarkagogy — the art or science of being snarky (now, there’s a college major for ya)
  • snarkalec — someone who consistently makes snarky remarks
  • snarkasm — snarky, with an undertone of sarcasm (for advanced snarkalecs only)
  • snarkhat — if you are not usually snarky, put it on to make a snarky comment; then take off

There are a lot more at UrbanDictionary.com.  (Figured it would be snarky to not reveal my source.)

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It’s no secret that Conan — and, for that matter, all the late-night talk shows — are taped much earlier in the day.

(Sorry.  I thought you knew.  Oh, and the Easter Bunny?  He’s really Russell Brand.)

Lately Conan has been taking advantage of the early taping by having members of his staff ‘live tweet’ the show during its East Coast air time.

It’s pretty fun.  They open a thread on Twitter, make comments as events unfold on the show, and reply to tweets sent in by viewers.

Last night, Conan himself decided to lead the conversation.  It was quite the event; they announced it hours ahead of time.

Then he live tweeted the show…on Facebook.

Now, I know some people use the two social media interchangeably.  Their tweets post on Facebook and vice versa.  I’ve complained about it before in this space.

But Facebook fans of Team Coco, back me up on this one:  the endless stream of out-of-context one-liners that Conan posted from 11p-12a ET last night didn’t belong on Facebook.

They were tweets, not Facebook status updates.  There is a difference, whether we like to admit it or not.

The Twitter audience is different.  The expectation in language and content is different.  The frequency, for cripes sake, is different.

I know I can hide Team Coco status updates on Facebook, just as I can hide Twitter feeds.  I can also walk away, which is what I chose to do.

I’m just surprised that an entertainer who has been so social media savvy throughout his career — and even more so when his career tanked — would make such an amateur mistake.