Tag Archives: snark

Jump the snark

I finally saw Bring It On the Musical tonight.

I’ve been waiting for over three years to see it…perhaps that’s why I was a little disappointed.
bring it on the musical

No, it was more than that.

The musical is merely inspired by the cult-classic film.  It borrows characters and story lines from the sequel, eliminates favorites and creates still more.

The school uniforms help if you get confused.

The musical also has a completely different tone.  It is very light on comedy.  Gone is the snark that made the original film so much fun to watch.  And somebody in the writers room loves earnest ballads.  I found myself groaning when yet another heartfelt musical number interrupted the dialogue.

But once they got into the heart of the competition, Bring It On really entertains.  If you like watching cheerleading competitions on ESPN, these are just as intense and high-flying…

Plus everyone is singing their lungs out!

No offense

You’ve no doubt been paid a compliment by someone.

But have you been the victim of the backhanded compliment?

You know — a comment that starts out flattering or kind, and then takes an unexpected turn, becoming cutting or cruel?

And the whole thing is delivered with a big ol’ innocent smile, which makes the insult all the more sneaky.  Sometimes you don’t even realize you were dissed until you’ve walked away.

SNAP.

Some friends in my neighborhood and I were discussing ‘favorite’ backhanded compliments received over the years during our regular evening walk.

Like the woman on the set of a television commercial who complimented my raincoat saying, “I love your jacket. That is a really hard shade of green for people to pull off.”

Or a fellow dog owner who was told in the park, “Well, I like your dog…I don’t care what all the other people say.”

Or my personal favorite: “I love your red toenail polish. It matches your fake red hair.”

Yes…yes, it does.

Funny how ‘compliments’ like these stick to our brains for years…whereas heartfelt good wishes fall away forgotten.  (Probably because they’re more clever, and we wish we had thought of them ourselves.)

Do you have any good zingers to share?  Leave them in the comments section for us all to enjoy.  But, no names, please.  Remember –

We wouldn’t want to offend.

Snarktastic

Yesterday I was miffed at snarky comments on Twitter and Facebook made by NYC locals who were underwhelmed by Hurricane Irene.

I wasn’t the only one.

Neighbors in New Jersey, Connecticut and Vermont who are underwater and without power were quick to snark back at their lack of empathy.

The snark resurfaced last night in live tweets about the VMAs, one of the few awards shows I don’t watch (but probably should based on the comments).

Which got me thinking… where does the word ‘snark’ come from?  How long has it been around?  And is there someone I can personally thank since it is so much fun to say?

‘Snark’ is simply the blending of ‘snide’ and ‘remark.’ I couldn’t find a date or person credited for the first mash-up of the word, but it’s a good one.

I did find lots of ‘snark’ derivations, which are brilliant in and of themselves.  I know you’ll want to add a few of them to your vocab:

  • snarkagogy — the art or science of being snarky (now, there’s a college major for ya)
  • snarkalec — someone who consistently makes snarky remarks
  • snarkasm — snarky, with an undertone of sarcasm (for advanced snarkalecs only)
  • snarkhat — if you are not usually snarky, put it on to make a snarky comment; then take off

There are a lot more at UrbanDictionary.com.  (Figured it would be snarky to not reveal my source.)

Snark week

Catastrophic events can bring out the best in people.

But if they don’t materialize as predicted, boy — it can bring out the snark in them as well.

Where’s the relief that Hurricane Irene didn’t gain strength?  That she was only a tropical storm when she entered New York City at Coney Island?  That the mayor evacuated those areas of the city that currently have water standing in the streets?

Instead, Facebook and Twitter are full of complaints from New Yorkers about how ‘lame’ this hurricane is.  How they wasted a Saturday preparing their homes and backyards and families.

Come on, people — how about a little gratitude that we were spared from what could have been?  Sure, the media spent 24/7 reporting on the storms, but it’s their job to keep us informed.

If they hadn’t, we would have complained about that.

It’s time to feel lucky, people.  I certainly do.