Tag Archives: Twitter

Deep thoughts

When I logged on to Twitter this morning, the trending topics reflected the serious topics of the day.

tax-day#TaxDay

#BostonDay

I was impressed that people were discussing issues of import instead of the usual One Direction laments and Kim Kardashian’s bottom.

But by day’s end?

#Arrow

#Survivor

#Bandwiches

Equilibrium has been restored.

Upgrade?

I started following @SteveJobQuotes on Twitter when the account appeared following his untimely death.

image

The account was exactly that — inspirational quotes from Jobs taken from his live talks or book.

It was food for thought.

But lately the tweets have taken a turn. Only today, “The best ways to flirt” and “Deadly fashion sins” were on their newsfeed.

I can’t picture Jobs having much to say on either topic, except perhaps —

“A black turtleneck is always right.”

Lottery deja vu

It’s hard to believe that it has been three and a half four years since I first saw The Book of Mormon in previews on Broadway.

I was in the audience twice in the first two weeks (in case it closed)…but luckily the critics and New York audiences agreed.

It was the “musical of the century.”

imageI won front-row orchestra tickets on Twitter for last night’s show. The faces have changed, and possibly some nuances of the staging, but it was just like seeing it for the first time.

Only better.

I made eye contact with the cast, said hello to the conductor and got spit on.

Spit on.

I got to take my friend Derek for his first-ever viewing.

This blog was created with a little help from my post last August, when I won the BOM Twitter lottery the first time.

Twitter etiquette

When Teddy Kennedy died back in August 2009, I was surprised to learn the news via Twitter instead of more traditional news sources.

Today, Twitter breaks most big stories.

bob simonFor instance, legendary CBS News reporter and 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon was killed yesterday in an automobile accident in my neighborhood, yet I still heard about it on Twitter.

Then celebrities from all walks of life began making their statements of sympathy.

On Twitter.

Yet another development many a publicist and PR maven probably didn’t see coming down the information superhighway.

All those carefully worded press releases and statements of sympathy and support that once earned them an extra billable hour or six?  Gone.  Because now their clients can take to Twitter and, in 140 typo- and emoji-filled characters, sum up their feelings about the dearly departed.

And start a Twitter sh#t storm at the same time.

Deja super vu

Second only to Pete Carroll’s really bad play call in the final seconds of last night’s Super Bowl is Left Shark.

He even has his own hashtag on Twitter.

Don’t know who #leftshark is? He was one of Katy Perry’s backup dancers. And his moves and killer costume earned him, in a matter of moments, his own Twitter account and social media stardom.

But just like his lesser lauded twin, Right Shark, I found Perry’s entire entourage a bit derivative.

There. I said it.

When I turned over to the half-time show, I thought I was watching a repeat of Pee Wee’s Playhouse.

pee wee

Ya gotta admit — the stage show borrowed his color palette.

And #leftshark? I’m pretty sure his ancestor showed up on Saturday Night Live some 35 years ago.

Landshark2So, don’t feel so bad, Pete.

You weren’t the only one who made a bad call last night.

Animal instincts

If you’ve spent any time on social media today, you may already know two great holidays have converged —

National Hug Day and Squirrel Appreciation Day.

If you’re like me, this accident of the calendar seems like a natural combination. I mean, what better way to show that cute little squirrel in your backyard or local park that you appreciate them than a big ol’ hug?

Then again, maybe not.

Laugh it off

I didn’t watch Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve 2015 with Ryan Seacrest, so I missed Idina Menzels’ performance of  the ubiquitous “Let It Go.”

idina-menzel-responds-to-critics-of-let-it-goRumor has it she botched the final high note.

(Haters on Twitter made sure that everyone knew.)

So Idina went on Twitter and defended herself, saying she is ‘more than one note.’

I can understand wanting to stand up to the backlash, but laughing at the sour note might be more effective.  Audiences love when people in the public eye can be self-deprecating.

Plus, why give nameless, faceless trolls the satisfaction of seeing you rattled?

Let it go, Idina.