Category Archives: Books

Graduation day!

A big thank you to the Barnes & Noble in Nanuet, New York.

They featured my book You’re a Leader, Charlie Brown in their list of graduation gift recommendations,  and even tweeted out a picture. (Tagged me, too.)

I’ve never been to Nanuet, but it has suddenly made the short list of my future vacation spots.

Coincidence? Not even.

Feeling bookish

I haven’t been posting to the Egg as frequently as I did in the past. For those of you who may have wondered why…

I wrote a book!

This book, to be precise. It was released today, on National Authors Day. You can find it online everywhere. 

(Hint: Search by title. The publishers were smart and listed it under the creator Charles Schulz instead of an unknown first-time hack.)

I am egg-cited!

Good grief 

Met Life, say it isn’t so.

You’re dropping Peanuts as the spokes characters for your brand?

Snoopy and the gang can sell anything…plus, your timing couldn’t be worse. 

The popular comic just released a new feature film, and a weekly cartoon series  is coming to television at the end of the year. Not to mention a new book (that I wrote) which is being released November 1st.

If I saw the Met Life folks, I think I would probably say:

I’m no genius

I thought I had read Thomas Wolfe, but it turns out I haven’t.

That didn’t stop me from going to see the movie Genius, which details the publication of Wolfe’s first two novels,  and his relationship with his editor Max Perkins.

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Jude Law’s Wolfe is a loud, melodramatic Southerner, self-involved yet low in self-esteem.  Colin Firth as Perkins is his solid, steady opposite,  the voice of reason who, despite his better judgment, is drawn to Wolfe’s charm and bravado.

I expected the movie to focus on their editorial process,  and it does. But instead of passing any judgments on Wolfe as a writer,  it celebrates their relationship – –  more like a father and son than editor and writer.

Both of their families suffered at times from their single-mindedness, but no one more than Wolfe himself.

I now have Wolfe’s first book Look Homeward, Angel on hold at the library. I suppose I was charmed as well.

Penciled in

Okay,  I finally caved.

After watching a fellow passenger color for three solid hours on a flight from San Francisco to Minneapolis,  I bought two books this weekend and gave it a try.

It’s pretty darn fun.

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This page is from a coloring book on Tokyo (which I visited in 2014).  I also got one on New York City.

I would write more,  but I think I  will color instead.

Today you are you

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One cake
Two cake
Red cake
Blue cake

Black cake
Blue cake
Old cake
New cake

This rhyme might have worked for fish,
But not so much for birthday wish…
es.

Say it like it is

I ran across a feature today online poking fun at the titles of young adult novels.

I recently took a couple of classes in YA lit at NYU, so this naturally caught my eye. And of all the ‘what they really should be called’ entries, this one made me say, “Oh, hell yeah!”

princess

Incendio!

I had to mail two packages at the post office today and noticed a book of Harry Potter stamps behind the counter.

They’re so pretty.

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So, of course I bought some.

(I knew you’d want to, too.)

Something’s afoot

You know Sherlock Holmes from novels, television and film.

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Mr. Holmes gives us the man behind the myth — the real detective that was fictionalized some 30 years after his last case.

This Holmes is 93 years old, frail and in the early stages of what appears to be Alzheimers. Aware that his memory is fading, he returns to his country home (and his bees) to attempt to piece together the forgotten details of his final case — a failure that made him leave sleuthing for good.

But why can’t he remember that mistake?

Ian McKellen is wonderful in the title role…more human and less ticky than his predecessors, although just as brutally honest. Laura Linney’s accent comes and goes as the dour housekeeper, but Milo Parker is winning as her son Roger, who helps Holmes care for his bees and ultimately find his past.

There’s even a little something for fans of Young Sherlock Holmes, which I am…so I left the theater happy.

Throw the book at ’em

book chart