Category Archives: History

In the dark

Are you a fan of Poldark?

poldark

I only discovered the Masterpiece series — which recently began its third season on PBS — a couple of weeks ago.

Now I’m hooked.

Flash flooding yesterday in Chicago gave me the perfect excuse to binge watch seasons 1 and 2 on Amazon Prime Video. (PBS members can also watch past episodes on their local affiliate website.)

The saga of the Captain Ross Poldark and his family set in post-Revolutionary War Cornwall is wonderful costume drama. And Aidan Turner as Poldark? Well, let’s just say I finally have a reason to watch the Hobbit movies, too.

But tonight?  I will be glued to the tube watching season 3 of Poldark.

 

 

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She persisted

king-letter

#resist

Tell the truth

The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.” — Teddy Roosevelt

The Kansas City Star, 18 May 1918

140 characters or less

mlk

Couldn’t have said it better, John.

#MLKDay

Hello, and this…

The Egg has seen an influx of new visitors this week —

A very sticky welcome!

And to those of you who are fellow US citizens…

vote

Lucky seven

Happy Seventh Birthday, Sticky Egg!

Seven

A lot has changed since I started this blog on a whim after watching the movie Julie and Julia.

New job. New city. New adventures, this time on my own.

Will this really be lucky seven?  I guess we’ll have to wait and see. Thanks for hanging around with me to find out!

Welcome home 

My mother’s china has been packed in a box for 27 years. 

I have taken it with me from city to city, to nine different homes, but have never had the cabinet space to display it. 

Well, today it sees the light!

Isn’t it beautiful? 

After all those moves, I unwrapped each piece with some trepidation, but only one was broken. 

It somehow seems fitting.

Patriotic packing 

The Egg is moving from Manhattan to Chicago at the end of July, and today, even my supplies are feeling the occasion!

#Happy4thofJuly #USA

No debate

I love a Craig Ferguson show, and his new series on History Channel, Join or Die, is no exception.

  • join or die

Craig along with three celebrities from various walks of life debate different topics and, with the studio audience’s assistance, crown a champion. Recent topics have included greatest unexplained phenomena, greatest gangster, history’s dumbest mistake, you get the idea.

This week they tackled history’s best founding father. The panelists were actor Fred Willard, comedian Jo Koy, and journalist Joel Stein. The founding father choices? George Washington, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson.

Now, I don’t expect the panelists to do excessive research in preparation for the show, but the dismissive comments they made about John Adams’ contribution to the founding of this country made me realize…

They hadn’t even watched the movie or stage version of 1776.

Take away their citizenship. Right. Now.

George Washington won, by the way. Shocker.

The science of love

On Valentine’s Day, it seems rather redundant to blog about love…but to not mention it at all would be rather Scrooge-like.

So I send this online Valentine to Sir Alexander Fleming, who on this very day — Valentine’s Day, 1929 — introduced penicillin to the world.

Maybe Alexander was mooning over his love that day in the lab when he left a plate of staphylococcus bacteria uncovered.  He later noticed that a mold — penicillium notatum — had fallen upon it and killed many of the bacteria.

Penicillin was born, and future scientists would develop it into the medicinal form used to treat many serious diseases, like syphilis and the ever icky staph infection.

Isn’t that romantic.

Although I am personally allergic to penicillin, I still think Alexander deserves some recognition on his anniversary.  If he hadn’t made such an important discovery in the field of medicine, a lot of folks wouldn’t be able to celebrate in a such a big way tonight…iffin you know what I mean.

Nudge nudge.  Wink wink.

 

Originally posted on February 14, 2011.