Category Archives: Magazine

The fine print

On my Delta flight back to NYC from Toronto today,  I was flipping through Sky magazine,  and an article on the Mississippi Delta caught my eye.

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Where to go.  What to do. All the summer festivals,  food and drink.

As I skimmed the recommendations,  one bolded phrase caught my eye:

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Pull up a chair and have a helping of barbecue at Kentucky’s Fancy Farm Picnic – –  the world’s largest picnic – –  held in August.

Look at that,  friends and family!  We’ve got another publication to add to the list!

I almost grabbed the PA from the flight attendant to get everyone to read page 83…but decided to let them discover it for themselves.

It’s more fun that way.

Too soon

Dear AARP:

This article in your latest edition of Bulletin arrived just a bit too soon after the “60 is the new 40” story…

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Let me have my illusions, okay?

Geez.

(Or should that be ‘geezer?’)

Topping tip

I read a great article today —

How to Turn Your Favorite Snack Food into Seasoning

The author recommends buying a cheap grinder at your local grocery store — perhaps when buying salt or pepper — and when it’s empty, placing small, broken-up chunks of your favorite snack foods inside.  Then use them as seasoning over appetizers, main dishes, desserts — you name it.

Voila — junk food seasoning.

grinderOf course, my first thought was Cheetos.

(If you’ve read this blog before, this should come as no surprise.)

We already know that Cheetos dust is super yummy eaten right off your fingers. Imagine it sprinkled on any of your favorite foods that already pair well with cheese…like popcorn.

Now you can take your Cheetos seasonings with you.  It’s certainly more portable than regular cheese since it doesn’t require refrigeration.

There’s enough preservatives in Cheetos to outlast us all.

This just in…

time eat butt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow. Crack me up.

Water, water everywhere

It is a frequent (and very sad) Facebook status:

“I’ve dropped my cellphone in water. Email me until I get it replaced.”

watery phoneThis hasn’t happened to me yet. But as recently as last month, I heard similar tales from family and friends. And I am always sympathetic (to keep karma on my side).

Today I offer a possible solution.

It’s called DryBox Rescue, a service offered by authorized dealers around the country.  Your soggy cellphone is placed in a patent-pending drying chamber.  The moisture is then removed —  at the molecular level — in less than 30 minutes.

It also works on other small electronic devices that are drawn to the toilet and sink —  mp3 players, cameras, GPS units, etc.

Full disclosure:  I’ve never used this service; I’ve just read about it in an airline magazine.  But it sounds like a much better option than 1) rice or 2) throwing away your pricey smart phone.

So, give it a look.  Other than the rather unfortunate name, I think it shows promise.

Dressed to soapbox

I object.

To the methodology and the terminology, and I demand an apology for Kansas City.

Travel + Leisure recently published their annual ‘America’s Favorite Cities’ survey, where readers rate major destinations in a number of categories.

“Worst Dressed City in America” is one of them.

Now, poor Anchorage has the most to be offended about — they earned the top spot — but Kansas City got punched at number ten.

Really?

Having travelers judge how well-dressed people are in a city is like judging a city’s cuisine by the offerings at the airport.  Tourists typically see other tourists when they visit anywhere.  Why?

Because they hit the tourist spots recommended by magazines like Travel + Leisure, which are congested with folks who don’t live there, and are dressing for comfort, not style.

“Worst Dressed Tourists in America” — perhaps.

But don’t judge a city by its gawkers.

Class act

My first memory of actor Alan Rickman is in the Bruce Willis movie Die Hard.  He played the evil villain Hans Gruber.

His voice and unique intonation made a lasting impression.

While I have loved Alan’s performances in romantic roles in Truly Madly Deeply and Sense and Sensibility –– and his wonderful comedic turn in GalaxyQuest — I think Alan is at his best playing the villain.

Or, at the very least, having all the surface qualities of one.

But as any Harry Potter fan knows, his character Severus Snape — who appeared to be a very bad guy for a majority of the series — turns out to be okay. (Hope I’m not ruining anything for you non-readers…but seriously, if you don’t know by now, that’s just sad.)

And it’s no surprise that Alan himself is a pretty stand-up guy as well. He wrote a heartfelt thank you note to JK Rowling in a recent issue of Empire magazine.

I think there’s an entire Harry Potter nation that couldn’t agree more.

Naked truth

Does a celebrity posing nude ever draw attention to anything…

besides the fact that they’re plum buck naked?

Adam Levine, front man for musical group Maroon-5, is the latest superstar to jump into the fray.  He appears in the latest issue of Cosmopolitan UK without a stitch on.  His pitch? 

Everyman, a campaign dedicated to raising awareness for testicular and prostate cancer. It funds the Everyman Centre in Surrey, Europe’s only male-centered cancer research center.

In deference to Cosmo’s readers,  that particular region of Levine’s body is artfully blocked in the shot by the hands of his girlfriend.  The rest is covered by tats.  Lots and lots of tats.

Are these photos a victory for cancer awareness?  I hope so.

Personally, I think the tattoo industry may get the biggest bang from Levine’s beefcake.

Solomon’s curse

You’ve heard the phrase “he had a face made for radio”?

Perhaps Deborah Solomon, who writes a weekly interview column for the “New York Times Magazine”, has a personality made for print.

Solomon interviewed Steve Martin at the 92nd Street Y in New York City on Monday night during a stop on the promotional tour for his new novel An Object of Beauty.

Afterward, the 92nd Street Y sent an email apology to all attendees along with a $50 ticket refund.  The email said, “We planned for a more comprehensive discussion and we, too, were disappointed with the evening.”

Steve’s new work of fiction takes place in the art world, and Solomon spent the bulk of the interview talking to him about just that.  Art.  And specific artists.

Steve is an avid art collector, and Solomon writes art criticism, so the two of them were having a bang up good time.  The problem?  The 900 people in attendance were not.

Solomon said the Y didn’t tell her what they wanted from the interview.  But any good facilitator is going to know her audience and gear her questions to their interests and motivations.

Solomon’s mistake?  She simply had the conversation with Steve that interested her.

Solomon’s reaction to the Y’s email?  “I think the Y, which is supposedly a champion of the arts, has behaved very crassly and is reinforcing the most philistine aspects of a culture that values celebrity and award shows over art.”

Maybe.   Or maybe they are respecting their audience, who buys memberships to their yearly lecture series, and will be there long after Solomon is gone.

Point of interest — when I saw Steve Martin on the 92nd Street Y calendar, I was at first anxious to attend.  But when I noted that Deborah Solomon was conducting the interview, I decided to skip it.

I saw the two appear together at the Times Center a couple of years ago.  Her interview there angered the audience in a very similar fashion.

Lesson learned.

NYC saves

In the most recent issue of New York magazine — which features Jon Stewart mugging on the cover — a sidebar stat jumped out at me more than any feature story could.

It compared suicide rates nationally versus those in New York City.  (The percentages quoted were per 100,000 population.)

Nation:  11.4 %

New York City 5.7%

(The numbers for Manhattan drop to 5.2% if you take away the out-of-towners who come to our lovely metropolis to off themselves.)

Surprised?  I certainly was.  I think we all assume that city living is more stressful, and higher stress leads to more thoughts — and acts — of ending it all.

And then you see these numbers.

But then — maybe I shouldn’t be so surprised.  Because even if New Yorkers think about ending it all, there is so much here to distract us from taking that final step!

Having a bad day?  You can go see a Broadway show!

Is your job is driving you insane?  Walk home through Central Park or just sit along the Hudson River and you’ll feel instantly renewed.

Life can seems meaningless and without merit…and then you have the opportunity to hear a great writer speak or witness an amazing piece of artwork up close and personal.  Even when your world seems small and claustrophobic, you can look around and see the diversity and beauty that is New York City.  I’m sure that fact alone saves people every day.

Oh…and Jon Stewart.  He keeps us going as well.