Tag Archives: Best Actor Oscar

We look but cannot see

Earlier this week, my friend Caroline re-watched The Way We Were after many years away from the film, and was blown away by two things:

  • Robert Redford the actor; and
  • Robert Redford the amazingly good-looking human being.

robert redford TWWWThe latter is an area of universal agreement.  No man has ever looked better than Redford did in this film.

See how Barbra Streisand is gazing up at him in the still from the movie?  Insert any woman — or man of that ilk — and they will have the same look of stunned appreciation on their face.

Perfection does that to a person.

Redford’s acting, on the other hand, has not always received the same level of appreciation.  But his upcoming movie, All is Lost, has generated Best Actor Oscar buzz at film festivals.

Take a look at the early trailer below.

Perhaps now that Redford is craggy instead of captivating, audiences are better able to focus on his performance.

I’ll be there!

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Where’s the love?

There’s a whole lotta hatin’ going on Facebook and Twitter about tomorrow’s Royal Wedding.

True, the news media is filled to bursting with coverage — all the minutiae on Kate and Wills, their families, the wedding parties, the route, the ceremony, the receptions, the ridiculous souvenirs.

It’s almost as annoying as NBC’s promotion of The Voice.

But how can Americans spew such bitterness upon these nuptials, when we typically lavish such love on all things British?

Don’t we get all excited each summer come Wimbledon… even though its finals fall on or around our nation’s Independence Day?  Sure, we have the US Open in September, but their tennis tournament has the Duke and Duchess of Kent, strawberries and cream, and spiffy tennis whites.

It’s so proper.  It’s soooo not us.

And don’t we love the actors and actresses who hail from the British isle, with their superior dramatic training and — most importantly — their glorious British accentsDidn’t we just bestow the Best Actor Oscar on the very worthy Colin Firth for his performance in The King’s Speech?  We love him ‘exactly as he is’ — for his Mr. Darcy-ness — a quality that could not be achieved if he were not British.

You know it’s true.

So, America, try to recapture some of the love for the British that was in your heart when you gave The King’s Speech the Best Picture Oscar…when the very prickly, very American The Social Network clearly deserved to win.

It’s there.  You’ve just forgotten.

(Ad campaigns will do that to you.)

Oscars fixed?

No, they weren’t fixed.  They were quite broken.

That’s why the ceremony lasted until past midnight ET, had not even one surprise winner and was a big ol’ fat yawn.

The only surprise of the evening was the appearance of Neil Patrick Harris in the opening number.  Martin Short was scheduled to do the honors, but had to pull out just days before the show due to ‘personal reasons.’  So, Harris was the unannounced fill-in.  My hopes soared.

And then were slowly suffocated by the standard awards show jokes and parade of predicted winners.

BO-RING.

So I propose the following fixes for the next decade of Academy Award broadcasts.

  1. Go back to five Best Picture nominees.  You upped it to 10, and there were still less than five legitimate contenders for the award.  You simply made the show longer, not more competitive.
  2. Hire new writers for the broadcast. We have all these great sitcoms doing really creative television.  Can’t we find a new way to be funny in a televised awards show other than to put the nominees in the audience on the spot?  I hate that.  They hate that.  And nine times out of 10, it’s just not that funny.
  3. Skip the long tributes to the nominated actors/actresses. Some of them were quite good.  Most of them sucked.  Show a longer clip of the nominated role instead.  You might actually get people to go to the movies.
  4. Hire permanent hosts. Have Neil Patrick Harris and Hugh Jackman alternate years.  Guaranteed charm, talent, good looks and triple threats.  I’m happy.
  5. Guarantee interesting shows. If all predicted winners win after the votes have been tabulated, randomize a minimum of five categories for the shock value alone.  The audience will stay tuned if they know that might be coming.

Now that sounds like an award winner.