Tag Archives: chefs

Egg on the wall

image

Isn’t this a beautiful image?

It reminds me of that Kohler faucet TV commercial:  I want to design a room around it.

It, in this case, is an omelet with a mushroom base. A pastry brush was used to create the stripes. It is one of many intriguing works of food art in the six-volume Modernist Culture: The Art and Science of Cooking by Nathan Myhrvold and his team of Seattle-based chefs.

Myhrvold is renown for his use of modern techniques and space-age ingredients.

I just like the pretty pictures.

Chop it off

Food Network has been the background noise in my house for a long time.

But lately I find myself losing patience with the shows that used to be appointment TV.

chopped chefsCase in point: Chopped, hosted by Ted Allen.

I can’t count the number of hours I have lost watching this program. When weekend marathons come on, my previous plans fall away. This food competition has had a spot on my DVR list since I purchased the technology.

Yet now I find myself hitting fast-forward, impatient for it to be finished. The format has become too familiar, the judges’ comments tired, the visiting chefs look-a-likes.

(And by this point, even I have a pretty good idea what to do with the basket ingredients, no matter how weird.)

I’m not the only one — Jesse David Fox at Vulture has had his own Food Network burn out.  It’s an interesting read.

Take a look.

Plus or minus flavor

Love to cook?

Or just love the idea of cooking?

If you spend hours in the kitchen — or in front of the TV watching Food Network chefs spend hours in theirs, you’ll love this guide to kitchen conversions by graphic designer Shannon Lattin.

the-common-cooks-howmany-guide-to-kitchen-conversions_50682c4599d7e_w587

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No need to break your brain anymore halving or tripling recipes — Shannon’s done it for you!

I’m just gonna use it to check other folk’s work.  (You’re welcome.)

With love

Dear restaurant chefs:

If you came to The Sticky Egg looking for a creative recipe for your weekend brunch menu, my apologizes.

We don’t do that kinda cookin’ here.

But if you are preparing to compete in Chopped on Food Network, I can help.

Previously an infrequent viewer, I recently sat through a Chopped marathon –ah, inertia — and have discovered the secrets to winning the Chopped championship and coveted $10,000 prize.

  1. Stories: The chef who puts his heart on his white sleeve usually wins.  His chatter to camera is filled with phrases like “love in my food,” “cooking with soul,” and “passion for food.”  The judges are also swayed by personal accounts of the chef’s family and/or upbringing.  Bring photos.  Obviously, you gotta cook well, but if the competition is close — stories can turn the tide.
  2. Seasonings — Be sure to use them.  A chef who doesn’t salt or pepper his dishes well is dismissed as an amateur.
  3. Sense — Show some.  If you only have 20 minutes to make an appetizer, don’t attempt to complete a dish that typically requires two hours.  Undercooked food really turns off the judges…and makes you look like a goober.

Of course, ignoring all these rules makes for more entertaining television, so you can forget I said anything, too.

I am, after all, just an Egg.

Full up

I’ve started seeing a lot of promos lately for the new seasons of “The Next Food Network Star” and “Top Chef.”  In fact, the first episode of “Food Network Star” aired last night.

(I know this because my DVR taped it while I was at the movies.)

All these would-be TV chefs vying for their own shows on Food Network and Bravo just look….blah to me.  Which made me realize — it’s finally happened.

I have had my fill of reality food television.

I mean, I still watch certain shows on Food Network…and goodness knows Rory watches the channel all the time when I’m not at home.  But the food chef competitions themselves may be on the way down, at least with me.

And really, have they produced any personalities with longevity besides Guy Fieri?  Can you even name any other “Food Network Star” winner from past seasons?  I certainly can’t.  They may still be around, but they are infinitely forgettable.  Same thing for “Top Chef.”

“Food Network Star” knows it, too.  They brought in a contestant ‘mentor’ this year in Giada De Laurentiis.  I guess they are hoping she will distract you from the beginning of the end.

So, enjoy this season.  It maybe the last course.