Tag Archives: Chopped

Chop it off

Food Network has been the background noise in my house for a long time.

But lately I find myself losing patience with the shows that used to be appointment TV.

chopped chefsCase in point: Chopped, hosted by Ted Allen.

I can’t count the number of hours I have lost watching this program. When weekend marathons come on, my previous plans fall away. This food competition has had a spot on my DVR list since I purchased the technology.

Yet now I find myself hitting fast-forward, impatient for it to be finished. The format has become too familiar, the judges’ comments tired, the visiting chefs look-a-likes.

(And by this point, even I have a pretty good idea what to do with the basket ingredients, no matter how weird.)

I’m not the only one — Jesse David Fox at Vulture has had his own Food Network burn out.  It’s an interesting read.

Take a look.

Bean wake-up call

Rory and I are watching Chopped, enjoying some couch time together post-Singapore, and one of the basket items is…

Baked beans

baked beansOf course, there is much discussion about how the beans are going to work with the striped bass, yadda yadda yadda. But it immediately took me back to Monday morning in Singapore when I ordered your typical bacon-and-eggs breakfast before my training session, and the hotel served them with a side of baked beans.

That woke me up.

But I have to say — they were awesome.  Sweet and smoky in flavor, the baked beans were perfect with the bacon.  In theory I guess it’s not that surprising, but it was a first for me.

May not be the last.

With love

Dear restaurant chefs:

If you came to The Sticky Egg looking for a creative recipe for your weekend brunch menu, my apologizes.

We don’t do that kinda cookin’ here.

But if you are preparing to compete in Chopped on Food Network, I can help.

Previously an infrequent viewer, I recently sat through a Chopped marathon –ah, inertia — and have discovered the secrets to winning the Chopped championship and coveted $10,000 prize.

  1. Stories: The chef who puts his heart on his white sleeve usually wins.  His chatter to camera is filled with phrases like “love in my food,” “cooking with soul,” and “passion for food.”  The judges are also swayed by personal accounts of the chef’s family and/or upbringing.  Bring photos.  Obviously, you gotta cook well, but if the competition is close — stories can turn the tide.
  2. Seasonings — Be sure to use them.  A chef who doesn’t salt or pepper his dishes well is dismissed as an amateur.
  3. Sense — Show some.  If you only have 20 minutes to make an appetizer, don’t attempt to complete a dish that typically requires two hours.  Undercooked food really turns off the judges…and makes you look like a goober.

Of course, ignoring all these rules makes for more entertaining television, so you can forget I said anything, too.

I am, after all, just an Egg.