Tag Archives: communication

What is it good for?

Twitter_Bird.svgTwitter, that is.

I have lots of friends that just don’t get it and aren’t on it. And I get that. Twitter often causes more harm than good.

But when it comes to customer service, I stand behind the blue bird.

I have had far more success getting results with a single tweet than with hours on hold or emails that go seemingly into the void.

Cable company gripes? Send a tweet. The response is almost instantaneous.

Pizza delivery subpar? Tweet your dissatisfaction. The corporate account will respond, and you might even get a coupon.

And when something good happens, mention that, too.

When I had a high fever from an ear infection on Labor Day, I was relieved to discover the CVS Minute Clinic was open in my neighborhood, so after my visit, I tweeted a thank you.

Minute Clinic responded, asking how I was feeling — nice! — then sent me a direct message, requesting the address of the clinic I visited and my full name and email address.

I received a $20 gift certificate via email a couple of days later, and I would imagine my local Minute Clinic got some props, too.

Tweets matter!

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The struggle is real

pronunciationFor the first time today, I realized that people can place pronunciation guides in their Facebook homepage profile.

For example, I could phonetically spell out “Curtsinger” so people don’t pronounce it “Crutsinjer,” which is very popular among customer service representatives and hotel registration desk employees.

But it’s my opinion that anyone who isn’t sure how to pronounce my last name probably shouldn’t be on my Facebook list.

On Twitter or Instagram? Sure. I follow people who I don’t know and whose name I would probably butcher if I met them on the street. We simply share common interests.

But Facebook?  These are my peeps. No pronunciation guide for you.

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Look what finally came in tbe mail:

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It’s official!

Now, where should I hang it….

Of course I can hear you

“We’re visiting from Arizona.”

“Our town is about an hour outside of Tucson.”

“We took the ferry to the Statute of Liberty, and now we have to meet our daughter up at 96th and Broadway, so we’re taking the train up there.  Hopefully we are on the right train — is this the right train?”

“We’ve found our way around the city pretty well so far…at least, I think we have.”

None of these comments are that remarkable…typical tourist conversation on the subway.

What is remarkable was this lady’s projection. I was all the way at the other end of the subway car, and it was like she was standing right in front of me.

The person she was talking to? Never caught a syllable.

One thing’s for sure — she will ever get lost in the city. Her family will be able to hear her coming and going.

Talk to each other

For more than a decade, I have taught classes to university students and corporate clients alike, emphasizing the importance of communication.

But the cautionary tale on tonight’s Project Runway team competition drives the point home better than any workshop or one-to-one coaching session.

SPOILER ALERT!

yangOne team’s inability to communicate — about anything — led to a truly terrible garment and a very expected exit for one (since her partner had immunity).

Sorry Hanmiao — but you kinda had it coming.

Howdy, stranger

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When I got on the subway this morning, I  overhead a woman introduce herself to a man standing close by.  Apparently they has begun chatting on the platform. 

She had already met her quota: speak to at least one stranger every day.

She probably didn’t know she was supposed to. But studies show that if you do, both you and the stranger will feel better.

Shhhhhhhiiiiiitttttt….we Southerners have known that all along.

Bless your heart

A friend in the education biz recently developed a course on customer service for his company.

I provided some general communication tips, but realized today that I didn’t mention a personal perspective that I have gained from years on the phone with customer service representatives:

southern accentIf the customer service representative speaks with a Southern accent, I:

a) believe they want to help me;

b) have found that they do help me; and

c) am in a better mood when I hang up because they are friendly — regardless of how I felt when started the call.

Now, I tend to believe that the people on the call on true Southerners. You can’t fake that hospitality…

Or can you?

It’s something the companies who depend on customer service — and, really, what company these days doesn’t — need to consider.  We can teach people how to lose an accent…

Why not teach customer service folks to have one?