Tag Archives: conversation

Predictable

I was waiting to board my flight to Chicago last night when I heard a fellow passenger utter the familiar phrase:

I bleed blue.

I immediately knew a UK Wildcats fan was at the gate, so I walked over and inserted myself into the conversation. What were the chances?

And can you guess how long it took before we were discussing the UK/Duke game of 1992?

50 days

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Of course I can hear you

“We’re visiting from Arizona.”

“Our town is about an hour outside of Tucson.”

“We took the ferry to the Statute of Liberty, and now we have to meet our daughter up at 96th and Broadway, so we’re taking the train up there.  Hopefully we are on the right train — is this the right train?”

“We’ve found our way around the city pretty well so far…at least, I think we have.”

None of these comments are that remarkable…typical tourist conversation on the subway.

What is remarkable was this lady’s projection. I was all the way at the other end of the subway car, and it was like she was standing right in front of me.

The person she was talking to? Never caught a syllable.

One thing’s for sure — she will ever get lost in the city. Her family will be able to hear her coming and going.

Howdy, stranger

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When I got on the subway this morning, I  overhead a woman introduce herself to a man standing close by.  Apparently they has begun chatting on the platform. 

She had already met her quota: speak to at least one stranger every day.

She probably didn’t know she was supposed to. But studies show that if you do, both you and the stranger will feel better.

Shhhhhhhiiiiiitttttt….we Southerners have known that all along.

A weighty subject

When you go to the lady doctor for your yearly poke-and-prod, some tests aren’t so yearly anymore.

Depending on your age and family history, your physician may recommend a Pap smear, for example, every two years… or a mammogram only after age 40.

(My family history is so checkered, I get to do these type of tests every year, but I’ve heard rumors.)

The other thing you have to do every time you walk in a doctor’s office is a weight check. This I feel should change.

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The nurse usually takes my weight, after consulting my chart. Unless I appear to have ballooned to an obese level, I don’t feel this is a necessary measure. It’s not the way I want to start the conversation, either…

Unless the nurse takes his/her weight, too. Then we have something to discuss.

Telephone tip

samsung galaxy s5I depend on my cellphone.

Most people do these days.

It’s never more apparent than when you misplace it or break it for even a single day.

It’s like losing a limb.

And I am ever so grateful to have my cellphone in hand when I’m walking down the sidewalk and see a couple of petition people lying in wait.

Like today.

I’m sure the two young ladies had something important to discuss with me — they always do, right? — but I just wanted to be on my way.  And my cellphone allowed me to do just that.

As soon as the petition people were in view, I put the cellphone to my ear and begin having a fascinating conversation.

With no one.

The petition people don’t bother folks on the phone.

Give it a try yourself sometime.

I hear voices

It’s hard to believe it’s been over three years since I first saw The Trip starring Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon.

the-trip-movie-posterI saw it in the theater then. Today was a chance encounter on HBO.

And I watched it again.

I still laughed at the two comedians’ competitive conversations and celebrity impressions.  But this time I found myself trying out a few of the characterizations — with very limited success.

Why can’t I do impressions better?  And why are they so darn good?

Obviously they have invested far more than 90 minutes towards this endeavor, but I wonder if I would be able to achieve any success with a lifetime of practice.

Do the Brits just have an edge?

I say yes.  (This stance saves me a lot of time and effort.)

Men of action

Since I had a late night celebrating New Year’s Eve — thank you, Skype — I decided to ease into 2015 reading on the couch.

Today’s tome?

Cary Elwes Photo and Book 09262014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No, Cary Elwes wasn’t here with me, darn the luck — but his memoir of the casting, preparation and filming of The Princess Bride reads like a candid conversation.

Elwes reminisces about every step and misstep (literally) in his journey as the sword-wielding Westley, true love of Buttercup and (SPOILER ALERT) secret identity of the Dread Pirate Roberts.  Every word telegraphs his enduring love for the role and for the cast and crew, as do sidebars from co-stars Mandy Patinkin, Robin Wright, Wallace Shawn, Billy Crystal and director Rob Reiner.

But it is Elwes’ gratitude and humility some 25 years later that are most endearing.  He has enjoyed a successful career in film, but acknowledges that he owes an enormous debt to…

The Man in Black.