Tag Archives: Food Network

Wait for it

It’s summer, and that means a lot of reality show competitions have been added to the TV schedule.

Food Network Star has been cookin’ with gas on Sunday evenings for several weeks already, and my beloved Project Runway got underway this past Thursday.

I never realize how much I miss them until they come back on they air, and then, when they do —

Press here

I just discovered something better than sliced bread —

Pressed bread

image

A toast press — shaped here like a teddy bear — makes your morning slice or lunch sandwich an event.

This is the first I have seen these…and they come in all kinds of designs.

That’s what I get for not watching Food Network anymore.

Home on the range

I had never watched HGTV until a recent trip to Lexington, Kentucky. After a weekend with my friends Vikki and Ella, I was hooked, and now HGTV is the official background noise in my apartment.

Sorry, Food Network. You’ve been replaced.

love it or list itA show that I now see a bit too often is Love It or List It.

A realtor and a home designer vie to fix the problems of a homeowner.

The realtor looks for a suitable new purchase. The home designer rehabs the current house on a set budget.  At the end of the program, the homeowners to have decide to “love it or list it.”

Way too often the owners keep the current house even though the designer wasn’t able to fix their problems, and the realtor found a home that met all their list of must-haves.

Why can’t people leave their trouble-filled homes?  Is it inertia?  Nostalgia for four walls with a roof?

I just don’t get it.

I have lived in nine different places since I moved out on my own, three of which I have owned, and I never shed a tear when I moved on to the next one…especially if the new place better met my needs.

Am I heartless?  Hopeless?

List it, baby, list it.

 

A bust

bubble wrapApparently some companies still think going ‘viral’ on social media is akin to catching ebola.

Case in point: Sealed Air, manufacturer of bubble wrap.

They recently posted a video of one of their plant foreman explaining how bubble wrap is made in response to a child’s question.

It reminded me of a segment of Unwrapped on Food Network, where they show you how gummy bears, for example, go from their sugary ingredients through the factory to packaging and ultimately the grocery story and your tummy.

The bubble wrap video caught the attention of several bloggers and was even the subject of a Reddit.  But soon after I viewed the video, Sealed Air took it down.

Off the blogs. Off any online mention.  And even off their own site, from what I can tell.

What gives?  Don’t they know all this chatter about a video on bubble wrap (of all things) is amazing?

Revel in the attention, guys.  Don’t burst our bubble.

Location, location

I’m watching Food Network Star right now, which has been in Las Vegas for the past couple of weeks.

But it certainly doesn’t look like Vegas.

food network star vegasEvery time Bobby, Alton or Giada — the show’s three hallowed hosts — stand before this season’s contestants to set up a challenge, it looks like they are shooting the episode in an empty room. Or vacant parking lot.

Food Network goes to such great lengths to clear out the ‘normal folk’ during production, Vegas looks nothing like the manic city I have experienced every time I’ve had the chance to visit.

Why go to the expense of using Vegas as your backdrop if you’re going to make it sterile and still?  You might as well fake the whole thing at the Food Network studios here in New York City.

The show’s producers must have heard me.  They just announced this week’s survivors are coming to Manhattan for the remainder of the season.

That will probably look like Cleveland.

 

 

Asleep in my takeout

I am fascinated by the critics’ take on the movie Chef, which is currently 88 percent fresh on RottenTomatoes.com.

I found it stale and oh-so-overcooked.

chef movie

I watch a lot of Food Network, so I had high hopes for the film’s ‘recipe’: a chef gets fired after he starts a Twitter war with a restaurant critic,  and opens a food truck.

Seems new, seems current.

Turns out all the conflict that drives the film is in the first 15 minutes.  After the chef (Jon Favreau) loses his job, everyone and everything starts working in his favor.

  • Need a food truck?  His ex-wife gets her other ex-husband to provide one.  Takes him to Miami to get it. Appears to bankroll the enterprise, too. (Sure, that happens.)
  • Need help setting it up?  His former junior cook travels across the country — without pay — to help him get started. That sainted ex-wife even takes orders at one point.
  • Need to reconnect with your kid? The ex-wife — again, the most non-confrontational divorced couple in the history of movies and life, for that matter — lets an 11-year old kid work as a line cook on a food truck for the entire summer. Without checking in. Right.

I don’t want to give away the ending in case you plan to see it.  But let’s just say that, once the food truck is parked —

Nothing really happens then, either. Or if it does, they don’t show it.

Because conflict might wake you up out of your food coma.

 

Chop it off

Food Network has been the background noise in my house for a long time.

But lately I find myself losing patience with the shows that used to be appointment TV.

chopped chefsCase in point: Chopped, hosted by Ted Allen.

I can’t count the number of hours I have lost watching this program. When weekend marathons come on, my previous plans fall away. This food competition has had a spot on my DVR list since I purchased the technology.

Yet now I find myself hitting fast-forward, impatient for it to be finished. The format has become too familiar, the judges’ comments tired, the visiting chefs look-a-likes.

(And by this point, even I have a pretty good idea what to do with the basket ingredients, no matter how weird.)

I’m not the only one — Jesse David Fox at Vulture has had his own Food Network burn out.  It’s an interesting read.

Take a look.