Tag Archives: government

Decisions, decisions

Earlier this evening a friend on Facebook posted the challenge:  “Favorite three TV shows of all time”  —

Go.

At first glance, I thought it an easy question.  Then I noticed the comments were few in number; many people had only listed one or two shows instead of the requested three.

After spending some time on the topic, now I understand why.

west wingMy first favorite was immediate and top of mind: The West Wing.  From episode one until the the drama drew its last breath, I was one of its biggest fans and most vocal supporters.  It’s what television — and government, for that matter — should be.

Jed Bartlet is still my president.

cheersMy second choice is more of a sentimental favorite.  I wrote my television programming  paper on Cheers as a freshman in college and rightly predicted that it was a comedy that had long legs.

I also watched Cheers — perhaps not with the same religious fervor as West Wing — but until its end.  And it was way cool to eventually live just a few blocks from the Boston bar that served as its inspiration.

My third choice was the hardest one. I watch a lot of television, a lot of great television — House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, Breaking Bad —
but I decided, if I was honest, I should choose the show that turned me into a schoolgirl fanatic:

downton_abbey_season2_Downton Abbey

I have the DVDs. And the hardback companion. And the bound scripts. And a couple of pictures on my office bulletin board.

Yeah, that probably qualifies as a favorite.

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Or we could fly a kite

So, Manhattan got four more inches of snow last night…on top of the eight that were already on the ground.

But the falling ice woke me up.

I don’t dwell on the weather too much — at least, not on this blog — but I have to wonder, as the local news reports power outages for thousands of residents yet again in New Jersey and other neighboring states —

ice on electrical wiresWhy don’t more cities bury their power lines?

Cost is probably the answer, but after a winter like this one — one that is not nearly over — I would think residents in New Jersey, for instance, might think of that cost as an investment.

Aren’t there lots of costs associated with fixing the downed lines after every storm? Trimming the trees around the downed lines? Lost productivity?  Lost revenue?

Lost food in the frig and freezer?

Just wondering.  I have electricity right now, and I think everyone else should, too.