Tag Archives: high-rise

Movie mashup

I saw a movie double feature this afternoon — Inside Llewyn Davis, directed by the Coen Brothers, and Her, directed by Spike Jonez.  But I needn’t have bothered.

They are the same film.

Both are about men who had recently lost a partner and were struggling to reconnect. When they do, they choose individuals — and I use that word consciously — that their friends and family don’t readily understand.

Each movie follows their journey.

inside llewyn davis

I would argue that Davis is the more successful of the two. Set in the 1960’s, it is stripped down and soulful, the soundtrack doing much of the storytelling and Oscar Isaac’s deep-set eyes doing the rest.  I read the cats were divas on set, but I found them very affecting. 

I loved this film.

her movie

Her is set in an unnamed future, told amid high rises and high tech. Compared to the very internal Davis, this movie’s heart is on its sleeve. Joaquin Phoenix’s character writes emotional, personal letters for other people for a living, yet can’t sustain a relationship…until he gets his new OS.

I do love Scarlett Johansson’s voice acting, but the movie itself is at least thirty minutes too long.

If you’re not one to spend five hours in the theatre, I suggest Inside Llewyn Davis for its beautiful story, amazing performances and soundtrack that stays with you long after you leave the theatre.

Incognito

I hope the people who make movie trailers actually go to the theater and watch the audience reaction.

It can be a real eye opener.

Case in point:  I went to “Inception” last night — what a wild ride that was — and saw two new trailers before the show:  one for “The Town,” one for “Devil.”

“The Town” stars Ben Affleck, Blake Lively, Jon Hamm and Jeremy Renner.  Set in Boston, it tells the story of a group of bank robbers, a bank manager they get involved with and the FBI agent who tries to take them down.  The trailer said it was from “the director of ‘Gone Baby Gone.'”

“Devil” puts a group of apparently random people in a high-rise elevator and stalls it.  Then all hell breaks loose.  There are no real name stars in the film; the trailer just touts it as being “from the mind of M. Night Shyamalan.”

Two interesting choices.

The first trailer did not specifically name Affleck as its director.  Did they suspect there might be negative connotations?  Some holdover from his earlier work in “Gigli” or “Jersey Girls?”

The second — which I think had the audience until this point — elicited groans and laughter when they threw M. Night Shyamalan’s name into the mix.  The movie appeared to lose all credibility with those three little words.

So, if anyone is listening — I think a teeny edit to the “Devil” trailer could make a big difference at the box office.

And M. Night — the slogan for “Devil” is “bad things happen for a reason.”

Try to keep that in mind…okay?