Tag Archives: history

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She persisted

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#resist

Tell the truth

The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.” — Teddy Roosevelt

The Kansas City Star, 18 May 1918

140 characters or less

mlk

Couldn’t have said it better, John.

#MLKDay

Hello, and this…

The Egg has seen an influx of new visitors this week —

A very sticky welcome!

And to those of you who are fellow US citizens…

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Lucky seven

Happy Seventh Birthday, Sticky Egg!

Seven

A lot has changed since I started this blog on a whim after watching the movie Julie and Julia.

New job. New city. New adventures, this time on my own.

Will this really be lucky seven?  I guess we’ll have to wait and see. Thanks for hanging around with me to find out!

Welcome home 

My mother’s china has been packed in a box for 27 years. 

I have taken it with me from city to city, to nine different homes, but have never had the cabinet space to display it. 

Well, today it sees the light!

Isn’t it beautiful? 

After all those moves, I unwrapped each piece with some trepidation, but only one was broken. 

It somehow seems fitting.

Patriotic packing 

The Egg is moving from Manhattan to Chicago at the end of July, and today, even my supplies are feeling the occasion!

#Happy4thofJuly #USA

The science of love

On Valentine’s Day, it seems rather redundant to blog about love…but to not mention it at all would be rather Scrooge-like.

So I send this online Valentine to Sir Alexander Fleming, who on this very day — Valentine’s Day, 1929 — introduced penicillin to the world.

Maybe Alexander was mooning over his love that day in the lab when he left a plate of staphylococcus bacteria uncovered.  He later noticed that a mold — penicillium notatum — had fallen upon it and killed many of the bacteria.

Penicillin was born, and future scientists would develop it into the medicinal form used to treat many serious diseases, like syphilis and the ever icky staph infection.

Isn’t that romantic.

Although I am personally allergic to penicillin, I still think Alexander deserves some recognition on his anniversary.  If he hadn’t made such an important discovery in the field of medicine, a lot of folks wouldn’t be able to celebrate in a such a big way tonight…iffin you know what I mean.

Nudge nudge.  Wink wink.

 

Originally posted on February 14, 2011. 

Spooky sweet

For the past three days, the kitchen at my office has been overwhelmed by a strong aroma of molasses.
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No one has ‘fessed up to eating waffles or pancakes, or syrup in any of its forms, but the molasses smell remains.

Then I read that today is the anniversary of the Great Molasses Flood of 1919!

Now granted, it took place in Boston’s North End. And I’ve never thought of food as having a spirit life. But…

I’m pretty sure the molasses ghosts are in our kitchen.

Hey sailor

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Seen on board a Lego recreation of the USS Missouri at Catigny Museum

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