Tag Archives: horror film

Scare tactics

I saw the movie Whiplash last night, and found it extremely compelling.

Are you planning to see it? Here are a few things you should know.

Whiplash-5547.cr2

 

  1. It’s not about jazz.  They play music, sure…but the selected songs — even the title track — are simply vehicles for the story.  The film could have just as easily taken place in the world of sports or the culinary arts.
  2. It is about abuse. The relationship between a music student and his no-holds-barred instructor — portrayed with gut-wrenching intensity by Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons — is difficult to watch. Teller is attacked emotionally and physically at every level, and like a hostage in a kidnapping incident, has a twisted love/hate relationship with his captor that boggles the mind.
  3. It’s hard to watch. In the theater where I saw the film, there were several horror movie trailers that preceded the feature presentation.  I found that odd until I saw the film.  There are definite similarities.

 

Scary movie?

This animal photo bomb isn’t from a horror film —

But don’t you think it should be?

scary sealI’m not even sure I could stomach the maniacal things that this seal probably has up his… flipper.

“The call came from inside the aquarium — run for your lives!!”

The real thing

I was more than a little excited when I saw the first trailer for Robert Redford’s The Conspirator two months ago.

Costume drama has that effect on me — James McAvoy does, too.

So while most moviegoers this weekend went tropical at the animated Rio — or were terrified by Scream4 — I spent my Saturday afternoon in a circa-1865 courtroom reliving the conspiracy trial that followed the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln.

I chose right.

Redford captured the aftermath of Lincoln’s assassination — the nation’s shock and grief, the worry of a new Confederate uprising, the lust for revenge and speedy ‘justice’…even if the evidence wasn’t there.

It’s easy to draw parallels to our world today.

Articles say Redford was working with a tiny budget; it wasn’t evident on-screen.  The period details were all there.  The parade of name actors was also impressive, even if the script didn’t always give them much to do.

No, The Conspirator shines because of two performances: Robin Wright as Mary Surratt, one of the accused, and McAvoy, her initially reluctant attorney, Frederick Aiken.

They are fierce and brave and, ultimately, are what make this movie an intensely moving experience.

“Doing the unrealistic is easier than doing the realistic.”  — Tim Ferriss