Tag Archives: literature

Say it like it is

I ran across a feature today online poking fun at the titles of young adult novels.

I recently took a couple of classes in YA lit at NYU, so this naturally caught my eye. And of all the ‘what they really should be called’ entries, this one made me say, “Oh, hell yeah!”

princess

Back to school

While The Egg has spent almost six years (!) pondering all things trivial, my friend John McCoy dares to discuss books from your high school reading list in his new podcast Sophomore Lit.

sophomore-lit-art-2I know — you think this is above my pay grade.

Wait for it.

I am a guest on the third episode, where John and I discuss a favorite book of mine, The Great Gatsby.

I invite you to listen to the episode and others in the series.  You may learn something.  (I certainly did.)

And, yes, I did make a few* references to the movie versions of Gatsby.

* Okay. Quite a lot, actually.  As my mother would say, ‘you can’t escape your raising.’

Wasted on the young

After my friend Kathy saw the Broadway play This Is Our Youth a few weeks ago, she quipped on Facebook:

Well, this isn’t my youth.

After seeing the show myself yesterday, I agree and disagree.

The pre-show literature had warned of some drug use in the show, which centers on 24 hours in the lives of three privileged kids on New York’s Upper West Side in the early 80’s. What it should have said is it’s about drug use. And drug dealing. And stealing for drugs. And selling your possessions for drugs.

Not my youth at all.

But the friendships and budding (and then dying) romance between the characters is very familiar and well-acted by the cast, which includes Michael Cera, Kieran Culkin and newcomer Tavi Gevinson.

They may have been fumbling around onstage in a fake stoner haze, but I’m not sure I was anymore self-assured as a clear-headed teenager back in the 80s.

That was my youth.

Moving pictures

The trailer for Words & Pictures, starring Juliette Binoche and Clive Owen, makes it look like a light romantic comedy.

Makes you wonder if the marketing folks even watched the film.
words and pictures

The promo oversimplifies the story to its most basic elements: two teachers at a private high school clash on the relative importance of art and literature while falling in love.

Tragic.

Not the movie; it was lovely.  What is tragic is  everything the trailer leaves out.

I don’t expect it to reveal every detail  — I’d prefer it didn’t — but the love story in W&P is very specific to the two teachers’ ages, health issues, and work and family situations.  It’s complicated because their lives are more complicated, which makes it a more interesting and multi-layered story.

And it deserves a trailer that reflects that.

Oh well, I’m a happy camper — I got way more movie than I expected!