Tag Archives: medicine

The best laid plans

I had big plans for Labor Day.

Despite the great advice I shared two days ago, I was going to work the day away.

ear My ears had different plans.

I had a slight cough yesterday — so slight that I thought it was a reaction to something in the air — but in the middle of the night, I woke up slightly disoriented with chills and fever.

I took some meds for the fever, but it was even higher this morning and my head hurt, so off I went to urgent treatment.

The diagnosis: an ear infection. My ears were ‘as red as the chairs in reception.’ (They were pretty darn red.)

I got a big ol’ bag full of drugs, and have been parked on the couch all day, trying to get my fever down and my spirits up because I feel like crap.

And I didn’t get a lick of work done.

I also appear to have called my boyfriend at 2:45am. For his sake, I hope that was a quick hang-up that he didn’t hear.

(Sorry about that.)

Advertisements

A tight squeeze

thank you noteA sincere thank you to Michael, the MRI technician at Lenox Hill Radiology, who was so patient with me today.

I have a history, recorded on this blog, of bad experiences with closed MRIs, and my claustrophobic fears seem to worsen with age.

Michael was extremely patient with this anxious, weepy woman who is far too old to be acting that way.

Many thanks, Michael.

Maybe I’ll outgrow this fear one day…like after I retire.

The science of love

On Valentine’s Day, it seems rather redundant to blog about love…but to not mention it at all would be rather Scrooge-like.

So I send this online Valentine to Sir Alexander Fleming, who on this very day — Valentine’s Day, 1929 — introduced penicillin to the world.

Maybe Alexander was mooning over his love that day in the lab when he left a plate of staphylococcus bacteria uncovered.  He later noticed that a mold — penicillium notatum — had fallen upon it and killed many of the bacteria.

Penicillin was born, and future scientists would develop it into the medicinal form used to treat many serious diseases, like syphilis and the ever icky staph infection.

Isn’t that romantic.

Although I am personally allergic to penicillin, I still think Alexander deserves some recognition on his anniversary.  If he hadn’t made such an important discovery in the field of medicine, a lot of folks wouldn’t be able to celebrate in a such a big way tonight…iffin you know what I mean.

Nudge nudge.  Wink wink.

 

Originally posted on February 14, 2011. 

Prescription filled

laughter

The producers

If you’re a fan of Downton Abbey — and really, who isn’t — you’ve no doubt seen this a few times:

“Funding for Masterpiece is provided by the Masterpiece Trust, created to ensure the series future, with support from Donald and Darlene Shiley and the following…”

“The following” change episode to episode, but the Shileys remain at the top of the list.  You’ll even see their names as supporters of Masterpiece Mystery.

Which got me thinking — who are Donald and Darlene Shiley? Should I know their names already?  And can I personally thank them for ‘ensuring the future’ and very existence of Downton Abbey?

Sadly, Donald died in August of last year, but not before he made tremendous contributions as a doctor and philanthropist.  Shiley collaborated with Swedish cardiologist Dr. Viking Bjork to develop the Bjork-Shiley heart valve, which is credited with saving hundreds of thousands of lives.

He also contributed millions to research centers in San Diego which bear his name. The Shiley Eye Center at UC San Diego. The Shiley Center for Science and Technology at the University of San Diego. The Donald P. Shiley Cardiovascular Research Center at San Diego State University.

He and his wife Darlene have given millions to Alzheimers research, the Scripps Clinic, The Old Globe Theater and KPBS.  (She worked as a TV public service director and promotions manager before their marriage.)

So now, each time I sit down to enjoy another addictive episode of Downton Abbey, I’ll smile knowing an even greater love story made the whole darn thing possible.