Tag Archives: middle aged women

Do what you love

Casting directors and agents in New York City often advise wannabe actors to create their own projects.

That way, they can do the kind of work that they want to be doing.

fading gigoloJust ask John Turturro.

He wrote, directed and stars in Fading Gigolo, the story of a guy with money problems who, with the encouragement and salesmanship of a good friend — portrayed by Woody Allen — finds himself the hired lover of a group of lonely middle-aged women.

It’s a great cast:  Sharon Stone, Sofia Vergara, Liev Schreiber, and in a star-making turn, Vanessa Paradis (better known as Johnny Depp’s long-time-but-not-so-much-anymore girlfriend).

The movie was very funny at times, and at other times, very serious and soulful.  The changes in pacing and tone were unexpected and unexplained.  I felt like I was watching two movies that didn’t quite gel, and there were jokes that flew over my goyish head that cracked up the rest of the art house crowd.

That being said, I enjoyed the individual performances and getting glimpses of my Upper West Side businesses and doorways in this very New York City film.

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It’s a long story

Should women of a ‘certain age’ have long hair?

I say yes.

So does Dominique Browning.  She’s a writer and former editor-in-chief of House and Garden.  At the age of 55, she’s sporting a rather impressive mane of long gray hair that reaches half-way down her back.

That mane has gotten her a lot of flack from her family, friends, and professional colleagues, and in a recent New York Times article, she posed possible reasons why.

She’s acting out.  Living in the 70’s.  Being high maintenance.  Trying to attract the fellas.  And she gladly owns up to all of them.

While I understand part of the issue really lies with her friends and family — anytime someone doesn’t conform, we question our own decisions —  I have to wonder why longer hair isn’t more popular with women in their middle years in the first place.

I understand why they cut their hair when they have children.  It’s easier to maintain short, and it keeps it out of reach of sticky, eager baby fingers.

It makes perfect sense.

But once the kids are older, and your skin starts to age and sag a bit, isn’t longer hair a nice distraction from the passing years?  I’m not suggesting you hide behind your hair…just give people something else pretty to gaze upon.

We do it all the time with clothing and jewelry.  Isn’t hair just another way to accessorize our look?