Tag Archives: Monsters

A+ I

The media has been talking so much lately about the movies that are really bad (Hot Pursuit, Paul Blart 2) that we haven’t heard nearly enough about the great ones.

Like Ex Machina.

Ex-Machina-cast-bannerSci fi? Yes.

But it’s so much more. And I challenge any of you who may have dismissed its AI premise to give it another look.

For one, the performances are stellar. Alicia Vikander as the robot Ava is stunning. You can completely understand why Caleb, played by the equally compelling Domhnall Gleeson, is so taken with her, because you are, too. (And does anyone remember that the two were also romantically paired in the wonderful Anna Karenina? #PointsMe)

Oscar Isaac is also the most wonderful kinda crazy as Ava’s inventor.  “Isn’t it strange,” Ava asks him, “to create something that hates you?”

The cat and mouse game in this movie is wonderful. The film is filled with monsters, and it won’t be too long before you don’t know which is which. You’ll leave the theater talking about this film long afterwards.

For the right reasons.

Monsters, of course

I saw Frankenstein at the Woodford Theatre Company in Versailles, Kentucky last night.

I was spooked.

Frankenstein

This production is an excellent reminder that local theater can get it right.

There’s death by every manner imaginable — hanging, gunshot, strangulation, beatings — and they all look amazingly real.  Give credit to the special effects designer and crew, and a cast that ‘dies on stage’ in the best way possible.

This is a serious translation of the original text — no campy Frank send-up here — and you have one more night to experience it.

Oh, and if you wonder about that one guy’s bloody, mangled face?

Red velvet cake. (I asked.)

 

Crying

This week the ever-interesting lemondrop.com introduced us to the  “Crying Wife,” who confessed to crying at pretty much every movie she watched, regardless of its original intent.

Of course, a wave of weepers jumped to her defense, admitting to tearing up at such classics as “Monsters, Inc.,” “Reading Rainbow,” “Pokemon,” and “Extreme Makeover Home Edition.”  I couldn’t really throw stones because I watched “Harvey” again this morning, and James Stewart’s gentle relationship with his invisible rabbit made me a little misty.

If animals are involved, I’m pretty much a goner.

I know that crying can be cathartic — just call me the “Crying Dog Mom”  — but I’m starting to wonder if movie studios have done research on the specific tear-producing triggers.  There is a reason that some scenes reduce you to tears and others make you sneer in response.

A great example is my recent favorite “Up in the Air.”  When George Clooney is speaking with Vera Famiga on the phone after surprising her at her home, the simple devastation on his face made me cry.  It was authentic, real.

What movie scene has made you cry like a little girl?

The “Crying Dog Mom” wants to know.