Tag Archives: mother

Welcome home 

My mother’s china has been packed in a box for 27 years. 

I have taken it with me from city to city, to nine different homes, but have never had the cabinet space to display it. 

Well, today it sees the light!

Isn’t it beautiful? 

After all those moves, I unwrapped each piece with some trepidation, but only one was broken. 

It somehow seems fitting.

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The music died

All the discussion of late around the Confederate flag brought the band Lynyrd Skynyrd to mind, since that flag is part of the band’s logo.

(I didn’t use that version here on The Sticky Egg because, um…no.)

lynyrd_skynyrd

That led us to talking about where we were when we learned about the plane crash that killed half of the band members.

[If you’re too young to a) know who Lynyrd Skynyrd is, or b) remember the plane crash, move along.]

I was in bed asleep. The phone rang — a corded phone, no less  — and I walked down to my mother’s bedroom to answer it. A good friend of my oldest brother was on the line, and he was crying. I may have been young, but I knew a call that late at night could only mean one thing…

Someone had died.

We woke up my brother, who came to the phone in a fog of sleep. We heard him say, “Oh no. Oh God. Oh no.” Then he hung up the phone and turned to go back to bed.  We stopped him, saying, “Wait — what happened?”

He said simply, “Lynyrd Skynyrd died.”

I’m not sure either my mother or I knew exactly what that meant, so we went on to bed.  When we questioned my brother the next morning, he barely remembered the phone call.

But it stuck in my memory, all these years — the day Lynyrd Skynyrd died.

E for effort

When Rory and I were walking home from Central Park this morning, we crossed paths with a women and her young son, who were presumably on their way to school.

She was explaining what each of the letter grades (A, B, C, D, F) in school meant, to which he replied:

“Why is there no E?”

gradesHuh. Good question.

She said, “There simply isn’t one,” which I didn’t think was a very satisfactory reply.

But I didn’t know the answer either,  so I asked the Google machine.

Turns out until the middle of the 20th Century, most schools in the United States used the four letter grading system E, S, N, U — Excellent, Satisfactory, Needs Improvement, and Unsatisfactory.
When they transitioned to the current system, they eliminated the E to avoid confusion.

So, ma’am, that’s what you should have told your little boy.

Gonna have to mark you down for a lack of research.

The very best

What do you see here?

image

Two flowers? Some greenery? A railing and steps?

You obviously haven’t worked at Hallmark.

When I see flowers in pairs, I think “that image would work well for love, engagement,  wedding, parents…or even mother and child” (if one bloom is noticeably smaller than the other or is a bud).

The same goes for groups of flowers. Or leaves. Or tree branches.

Even though I left Hallmark over 12 years ago, I still look at scenes in nature and put a card caption on ’em.

I think I may need a get well card.

Smile!

A good friend’s son recently announced on Facebook that he was getting braces.

His status updates on the big event were a countdown of sorts, beginning the day before, then that morning.  After the orthodontist had done the deed, he posted, “Four hours down, 21 months to go.”

Oh, how I know that feeling.

I had braces, too.  In fact, my mother had three kids in braces (and would have had four if my oldest brother hadn’t conveniently knocked out his front teeth in a bicycle accident and required more drastic measures).

Of all the gifts my mother gave me in life — and there were too many to list here — I look back on those two years in braces with much love and gratitude.  I know they were costly, especially multiplied by three.  But what an investment they were for our future health and happiness.

Plus, since the orthodontist was in Paducah, Kentucky — a 30-minute drive from my hometown — the monthly check-ups meant missing a half-day of school.  Oh, how I loved those trips with Mom!  We’d get the dental appointment out of the way, then go shopping or eat.

And she’d always made sure there was a treat I could eat (since so much was nixed by my mouth full of metal).

So, I hope my friend can appreciate his time ‘under the wire.’  Thanks to my mom, it put the smile on my face.