Tag Archives: movie review

No fault

I saw the movie The Fault in Our Stars today.

image

I hadn’t read the book, so I could judge it on face value. No expectations. No preconceived notions. No condemnation for any meandering from the original plot.

But I’m pretty sure that, even if I’d been watching with a more critical eye, I still would have been bowled over by Augustus and Hazel Grace.

I am not a fan of cancer movies — when you have experienced the unhappy ending in real life , it’s hard to get on board for the journey on film — but I was transfixed by theses two kids’ humor and courage and life in the face of certain death.

The cast was exceptional all-around, and while I don’t know what parts were true to the original text and was what added later, to my eye it was seamless and sensitive.

Okay? 

Okay.

Advertisements

Comedy con

I saw American Hustle tonight.

american-hustle

The movie and all its stars completely deserve all the Golden Globe nominations they racked up.

But my favorite thing about the film is an actor who does not appear in any of the trailers or talk show promotion.  A few of the reviews did spill the beans — so don’t read them before you go — because his performance is such a wonderful surprise!

Okay, I’ll give you a little hint:  he is a funny man who plays the most incredible straight man in the movie.  I loved every minute!

Go see it.  And you’ll know immediately who I’m talking about…

No con here.

Films in-flight

I have two movie recommendations for you tonight.

They are both foreign films — one French, the other Israeli — so I suppose it is fitting that I watched them both on my plane home from Germany.

The first, The Intouchables, was recommended to me on the flight to Germany by the passenger in the seat next to me — a policeman on his way home from holiday.

I took his advice today and loved the film so much, I want to pay it forward.  The Intouchables tells the story of Phillipe, a quadriplegic — he was injured hang gliding — who needs a new caregiver.  Driss only applies for the job so that he will get turned down and be able to continue to live on public assistance. His careless attitude tweaks Phillipe’s interest, and he hires him.  Watching their friendship grow and change them both is perfection.

It is a feel good movie made one better because it is based on a true story.

The second movie, Footnote, centers on a father-son relationship that it is far more distant and troubled. The two are Talmud scholars who work and compete in the same very narrow field of study…and the son is winning the war.

How do his achievements impact his relationship with his father?  And how far will he go to make things right? This little film makes you think.

And I think you will enjoy them both.

Say it isn’t so

This is my final Twilight saga movie review.  No doubt my friend Tina is already poised to type the words “Barf.”

I wonder if she is feeling sentimental, too.

I saw Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 last night at a special early screening.  I was curious if director Bill Condon could pull together a fitting end to the series, since he  had already used in my estimation all the ‘good stuff’ from the final book in Part 1.

The audience at the early show was pumped, but there was none of the mania of years past.  I’d like to think we’ve all matured a little.

The film has, too.

The screenplay has a sense of humor.  It was funny…on purpose.  And at times also sweet and sad.

Part 2 also features vampire Bella.  For all the critics who have slammed her character for being weak and codependent, come see her being seriously bad-ass. To everyone.  All she needs is a bow-and-arrow and ‘luck forever in her favor.’

Most importantly, Part 2 is action-packed and full of surprises.  I haven’t made this much noise watching a movie in ages — the vampire battle is shocking and strewn with death.

Even if you’re not a big Twilight fan, I strongly recommend you come see how it all ends.

Epic?  Indeed.

Hear ye

On the surface, Hit and Run doesn’t look like a message movie.

But then again, I didn’t really go to learn anything.

I like the story of how this little movie, written and directed by Dax Shephard — who also stars in the film with his girlfriend Kristen Bell and a lot of his friends — was made for a song and then got picked up by a major distributor and is now in theaters.

The little engine that could.

So while the plot isn’t my normal cup of tea, I went to see it to support indie film making…and actors that I enjoy watching.  And then this tiny sub-plot pops up half-way through the movie —

A message for dog owners, no less.

How you shouldn’t tie up your pets outside stores and restaurants where they could easily be stolen.  And the big difference the type of food you feed your dog makes, both in their health and happiness.

And who taught these lessons in the movie?

The “bad guy”…in a really funny way.  It’s worth the price of the film just to see this short segment.  I applaud Dax for finding a way to make those points in such an entertaining fashion.

Here’s hoping folks get the message.

Date night

Definitives are dangerous. Absolutes? An abomination. And yet I sit here, prepared to name (key the reverb)…

The Ultimate Date Movie of All Time.

Why now?  Because it was on TV while I was eating lunch today. And I watched it….yet again. And cried…yet again.

And did I mention it was a baseball movie?

My friends and family will not be surprised by my choice.  I often champion For Love of the Game when movie debates take a male / female, he-said / she-said turn.

What other movie has it all?  Such meaty relationship “stuff” for girls (and boys) who want to spend two hours pondering love and all its highs, lows, recoveries and gut-wrenching blows?  Add the story of a baseball player, poised to pitch a perfect game and perhaps say good-bye to the sport that he has lived and loved for almost two decades?

Come on.

Even if you don’t like the game, this movie will have you cheering each time he steps up to the mound.  And if you don’t shed a tear or two, well —

No doubt you’re trying to look tough in front of your girlfriend.

Harry scary

Thinking about seeing The Woman in Black, starring Daniel Radcliffe, this weekend?
The Sticky Egg was at the theatre first thing this morning to bring you this review.

Plus, I don’t see scary movies close to bedtime.  I’ve learned that lesson the hard way. (Remind me to tell you about my Blair Witch Project fiasco sometime.)

The Woman in Black is my favorite kind of horror film.  The ghosts are scary, but they pretty much stay in one place — in this instance, an old haunted house in Yorkshire at the turn of the century.  There’s also no gore.

I hate gore.

Daniel Radcliffe, who has joked about being cast as Harry Potter because of his ‘orphan eyes,’ uses them to full effect here as a still grieving widowed lawyer sent to the haunted manse on business for the former owner.

Once there, he sees the legendary Woman in Black and soon children in the village begin to die in horrific ways.

I love the look of the film — so gray and cold.  I kept burrowing under my coat to get warm in the theatre.  Radcliffe disappears into the role as well; you won’t confuse him with Harry here.  The film is well paced, building slowly and eerily towards it climax.

Or what you think is the climax.

Bwha ha ha.