Tag Archives: NYU

Say it like it is

I ran across a feature today online poking fun at the titles of young adult novels.

I recently took a couple of classes in YA lit at NYU, so this naturally caught my eye. And of all the ‘what they really should be called’ entries, this one made me say, “Oh, hell yeah!”



Suitable for framing

Look what finally came in tbe mail:


It’s official!

Now, where should I hang it….

Dirty little secret

I’m taking a class in children’s book publishing this semester at NYU. We’ve read picture books, middle grade, young adult, you name it.

I took the class the learn about the editing side of the biz…but the more I learn about children’s fiction and non-fiction, the more I’d like to take a stab at writing it.

The interesting twist is that, even though the books are for kids, the parents are the ones who buy and read them.  So that’s why books like these are bestsellers.

fuck to sleep

fucking eat












Hey — maybe I can do this.


Coming soon

I began the third class of my publishing certificate at NYU tonight.

The instructor, a literary agent at a boutique firm here in New York City, was describing some of the ways authors have promoted their books above-and-beyond their publisher’s efforts.

press playEric Devine gets my vote for most creative.

His young adult novel Press Play is being published in October.  It tells the story of a high school student who accidentally captures footage of the violent hazing practices of the lacrosse team while filming his documentary film project.

Devine had the idea to create a book trailer — like a movie trailer, but for his book — and display it at the local movie theatre in his home town of Waterford, New York

On an agreed-upon evening, Devine’s book trailer will air multiple times before the movies, inviting viewers to purchase Press Play at the mall bookstore where the cinema is located.

I think this is inspired.

A film features prominently in the book, and Devine is using the movies to promote it.  He’ll probably get local publicity for this unique angle, too.

I wish I could go watch!



Tiny treats

I’m taking a class at NYU this fall and ordered my textbooks from Amazon. When a delivery arrived this morning, I broke open the box, expecting to see books.

On top of the air bladders was a thank you note for my order with two small sample packs of Mike and Ike.

mike and ikes I thought this was a new Amazon policy, which I — a sugarholic — was immediately behind.

But once I dug a little deeper, I realized the shipment was actually an early birthday gift from Peeps & Company, which makes Mike and Ike (and Peeps, as you might imagine).

orange peepsI was lucky enough to receive both!

But I still think it would be a great idea for Internet merchants like Amazon to include a candy surprise in their shipments.  It was only a tiny package — maybe 8 pieces — but it still put a smile on my face.

It’s the little things…


Gutter pie

A funny thing happened on the way to NYU last night.

Well, funny for me…and some random passersby.

A guy I do not know — actually, I do not know anyone in this story — had just bought a slice of pizza at a restaurant on the corner of 33rd Street and Park. He was trying to cross the street before the light changed, so he had quite a bit of momentum on his side.

As it turned out, a bit too much…because he lost his grip and the slice went flying —

pizzagutterInto the gutter.

Now, this is not funny.  It’s actually rather sad.  He had just bought the slice, he dropped it and now it’s gone.


No, the funny part was his visible indecision on whether or not to pick it up and still eat it.

When it first hit the street, he was going for it.  He was going to employ the ‘five-second rule,’ snatch it up and be on his merry way.  But then it slid into the gutter….and he just couldn’t do it.

So he cried out in frustration and walked on.

This entertained myself and about three other people for a couple of blocks.  We laughed together and joked about it, sadly at his expense.  And now I’m blogging about it.



Fair warning

Weeks before the 2011 Academy Awards hit the air, the producers warned everyone in pre-show interviews that their young hosts weren’t comedians, so we shouldn’t expect jokes.

Anne and James weren’t bringing the funny.

And they were right.  They didn’t.

Anne did bring an overly energetic brightness to the stage that became grating.  Her big number went well, but I’m sure Hugh Jackman is even happier today that he dodged that bullet.

James, on the other hand, was quiet and appeared stoned.  He even had trouble reading the teleprompter.  (Hey, it’s a skill not all people can master.)  I think he regretted taking job #1,714 as soon as he stepped on stage, and his partnership with perky Anne even more so.

Oil and water, those two.

It made me even more grateful for the moments to come in the Oscar acceptance speeches.

Moments of wonderful self-deprecation from Best Actor winner Colin Firth:
“I have a feeling my career’s just peaked.”

…and NYU student Luke Matheny, upon winning the Oscar for Best Live Action Short Film God of Love:
“Oh, I should have got a haircut!”

Entertaining shout-outs to family members, including Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar winner Aaron Sorkin for The Social Network:

“Roxy Sorkin, your father just won the Academy Award, I’m going to insist on some respect from your guinea pig.”

…and Tom Hooper, giving credit to his mother for finding The King’s Speech during his Best Director Oscar acceptance:

“The moral of the story is, listen to your mother.”

And perhaps most inspiring of all — especially for Sticky Eggs like me — were David Seidler’s words upon receiving his Best Screenplay Oscar for “Speech.”

“My father always said to me I would be a late bloomer.  I believe I am the oldest person to win this particular award.  I hope that record is broken quickly and often.”

Now, that’s what we needed to hear.