Tag Archives: pacing

Bloodline post-binge

I finished watching the 13th and final episode of season one of Bloodline, the new drama from Netflix, who just keeps churning out these excellent shows.
bloodline
I thought this might be a one-and-done, but they recently announced the show will be back for season two.

That explains a couple of things about the finale…which I won’t mention here.

I want you to watch it, of course, if you aren’t already. And here’s why.

  1. Ben Mendelsohn  — Apparently he is a leading actor in his native Australia, but even as much as I watch movies and TV, his face was new to me.  He is brilliant. Really. He quietly steals every scene on the strength of his character work alone.
  2. Water Torture — The show may take place at a hotel on the Florida Keys, but the layers of mystery that surround the family members are doled out in excruciatingly slow drips. And I love it. When you’re used to movie trailers giving away the entire film in less than two minutes, it’s nice to have a genuine surprise in every episode. This pacing fits the leisurely vacation location, too.
  3. Game of Thrones — Characters drop right and left; that’s why I thought the show was over in one season. The second year is going to be interesting, but I have faith in the strong–albeit bloodied–cast that remains.

So, add it to your Netflix queue.  You will thank me!

A true story

The movie Foxcatcher, starring Steve Carrell, Channing Tatum and Mark Ruffalo, is based on a true story. That’s about all I knew — well, that and Carrell wears a prosthetic nose.

And we all know a fake schnoz can land you an Oscar. Just ask Nicole Kidman.

foxcatcher

After seeing the film, I’m glad I was so uninformed.  This telling of Olympic wrestler Mike Schultz’s relationship with his sponsor, millionaire John du Pont, is so slow and deliberate that I might have lost patience if I had known how it was going to end.

But the performances — not the plot — are the reason to see this film.  All three actors disappear into these characters who, with the exception of Ruffalo, struggle with varying shades of mental illness and mommy issues.

And when actors who usually take pratfalls raise their game to this level, you simply have to see it.

Fair warning — you may never look at Michael Scott the same way again.

 

Do what you love

Casting directors and agents in New York City often advise wannabe actors to create their own projects.

That way, they can do the kind of work that they want to be doing.

fading gigoloJust ask John Turturro.

He wrote, directed and stars in Fading Gigolo, the story of a guy with money problems who, with the encouragement and salesmanship of a good friend — portrayed by Woody Allen — finds himself the hired lover of a group of lonely middle-aged women.

It’s a great cast:  Sharon Stone, Sofia Vergara, Liev Schreiber, and in a star-making turn, Vanessa Paradis (better known as Johnny Depp’s long-time-but-not-so-much-anymore girlfriend).

The movie was very funny at times, and at other times, very serious and soulful.  The changes in pacing and tone were unexpected and unexplained.  I felt like I was watching two movies that didn’t quite gel, and there were jokes that flew over my goyish head that cracked up the rest of the art house crowd.

That being said, I enjoyed the individual performances and getting glimpses of my Upper West Side businesses and doorways in this very New York City film.