Tag Archives: psychology

Seeing pink

It’s the US Open Men’s Championship.   Djokovic is playing Federer.  All is right with the world.

Almost.

rogerfederHave you spied Roger’s gear for this year’s tourney?  His tennis whites are outlined in bright poppy pink.

Even his tennis shoes are dyed this neon bright color.

Eww.

I’m not a fan of pink, but this isn’t an issue of personal preference.

The hot pink is an unusual choice, and I’m wondering if it was psychological. Did Roger’s team hope that the color would have its rumored effect of sapping his opponent’s strength?

stan wawrinka

Stan Wawrinka wore a similar hue in his triumphant run earlier this year at the French Open — in plaid shorts, no less.

Hmmm….

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Chew on this

Does chewing gum make you more attractive?

Beldent Gum conducted a social experiment and concluded that yes, in fact, it does. Take a look below.

Sorry, Beldent. It wasn’t the gum that made the chewing twin the more attractive choice. It was the total lack of animation on the carbon copy’s face!

The gum chewing twin was making eye contact with the study participants and had facial movements — all signs of life. The other was stoic, corpse-like, and a bit unnerving.

So, don’t increase production at your factory just yet, Beldent. (Although I’ll admit, this whole thing is a really good ad.)

Tight spaces

I am claustrophobic.

ClaustrophobiaAnd the condition rears its ugly head at the most inopportune times.

Riding the elevator to the top of the St. Louis Arch.  Getting an MRI for a shoulder injury.  Or simply being crowded into the corner of the elevator by one too many people.

But I never thought a facial would freak me out.

I was at a salon today over lunch — indulging in said facial, thanks to a birthday gift card from a generous friend — and the technician completely covered my face with a solid wrap, leaving only a small slit for my mouth.

Needless to say, I panicked.

Once I explained my phobia, she offered to leave a slit for my nose as well.  I still couldn’t see, but I did deep breathing and mind games to remain calm. Not exactly the soothing experience I had in mind…but hey —

My skin looks fabulous!

The most unguarded of scrambled egg eaters

While The Sticky Egg is no doubt your favorite egg-y blog — thank you for that — chances are you prefer eggs cooked in a somewhat different style.

But what does your favorite egg prep say about you?

scrambled eggsAn eggs-ceptional amount.

MindLab International researched the psychology behind this consumer choice in a study conducted for the British Egg Industry Council. Here is what they found your egg choice says about you:

  • Poached egg-eaters — outgoing and happier than most.
  • Boiled egg-eaters — disorganized and at the greatest risk of getting divorced.
  • Fried egg fans — have a high sex drive (!!) and usually hail from the ‘skilled working class’ (so British, right?).
  • Scrambled eggs — preferred by people who are guarded and without children.
  • Omelettes  — are self-disciplined.

Strangely, the study didn’t say what a preference for The Sticky Egg says about you….

Brilliant?  Good looking?  I’d say that’s a pretty safe bet.

Shopper fatigue

Do you like being lost?  Disoriented?

IKEA is betting your own cold, hard cash that you don’t.  That’s why they’ve designed their stores like a maze.

It takes the average shopper three hours  — and some as long as eight — to weave their way through the retailer’s carefully merchandised, catalog-inspired stores.  So by the time shoppers are able to find the warehouse area where they can actually purchase something and leave, they usually buy stuff they never intended (or perhaps even wanted).

It’s simple psychology, says Alan Penn, director of the Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment at University College London.  The longer shoppers are exposed to IKEA’s products, the more impulse buys they are likely to make.  And the confusing layout means they grab stuff when they see it, because backtracking to find items later would require bread crumbs…or an overnight stay.

This type of conscious manipulation kinda creeps me out…and pisses me off a little.  I have always thought of IKEA products as sleek, modern and forward thinking — all about ease and simplicity.

But this kind of marketing duplicity runs counter to their brand image.  When your products are as cool as IKEA’s — and as well-priced — do you really have to trap shoppers in the store to make sure they buy enough before they leave?

Maybe I’m the one being simple.