Tag Archives: Robin Wright

Men of action

Since I had a late night celebrating New Year’s Eve — thank you, Skype — I decided to ease into 2015 reading on the couch.

Today’s tome?

Cary Elwes Photo and Book 09262014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No, Cary Elwes wasn’t here with me, darn the luck — but his memoir of the casting, preparation and filming of The Princess Bride reads like a candid conversation.

Elwes reminisces about every step and misstep (literally) in his journey as the sword-wielding Westley, true love of Buttercup and (SPOILER ALERT) secret identity of the Dread Pirate Roberts.  Every word telegraphs his enduring love for the role and for the cast and crew, as do sidebars from co-stars Mandy Patinkin, Robin Wright, Wallace Shawn, Billy Crystal and director Rob Reiner.

But it is Elwes’ gratitude and humility some 25 years later that are most endearing.  He has enjoyed a successful career in film, but acknowledges that he owes an enormous debt to…

The Man in Black.

 

 

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The real thing

I was more than a little excited when I saw the first trailer for Robert Redford’s The Conspirator two months ago.

Costume drama has that effect on me — James McAvoy does, too.

So while most moviegoers this weekend went tropical at the animated Rio — or were terrified by Scream4 — I spent my Saturday afternoon in a circa-1865 courtroom reliving the conspiracy trial that followed the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln.

I chose right.

Redford captured the aftermath of Lincoln’s assassination — the nation’s shock and grief, the worry of a new Confederate uprising, the lust for revenge and speedy ‘justice’…even if the evidence wasn’t there.

It’s easy to draw parallels to our world today.

Articles say Redford was working with a tiny budget; it wasn’t evident on-screen.  The period details were all there.  The parade of name actors was also impressive, even if the script didn’t always give them much to do.

No, The Conspirator shines because of two performances: Robin Wright as Mary Surratt, one of the accused, and McAvoy, her initially reluctant attorney, Frederick Aiken.

They are fierce and brave and, ultimately, are what make this movie an intensely moving experience.

“Doing the unrealistic is easier than doing the realistic.”  — Tim Ferriss