Tag Archives: Russell Brand

I’ll alert the media

I passed this delivery truck in my neighborhood yesterday afternoon.  The service is new to me, but the name is a classic.

image

Can it really be over 30 years now — 1981 in fact — since Dudley Moore burst onto the scene in the comedy classic Arthur, with Sir John Gielgud at his side as his loyal, oh-so-proper manservant Hobson?
arthur hobson

Even he might approve of the logo’s jaunty cap and just-so tie.

The driver of the delivery van was very young.  I couldn’t help but wonder — does he even understand the reference for the company name?

Perhaps he is more familiar with the cringeworthy 2011 movie version of Arthur where Helen Mirren portrayed  Hobson in a bit of gender-bending casting.  If so, he is probably confused by the logo. (Helen didn’t wear a hat.)

And thinks the movie was awful.

Young people.

 

 

 

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The brave one

Have you seen the Disney Dream Portraits by Annie Leibovitz?

She posed celebrities as classic heroes and villains from Disney films: Jessica Chastain as Merida in Brave. Russell Brand as Captain Hook. Taylor Swift as Rapunzel.

They are really something.

But I think they are wasted on celebs.  I mean, regular folk would be a more impressive transformation, don’t you think?

carla_brave photoshop

 
Oh yes, I quite agree.

That’s rich

You learn something new every day.  I know I do.

Take Forbes.com.

When I think of Forbes, I think of lists — lots of ’em, all about money and investing.  The best colleges to attend to get a job.  The best companies to work for.  The best investments that money can buy.

Basically, they know a lot more about money than I ever will…and probably take it more seriously.  That’s it — I think of them as being serious.

Well, when I’m wrong, I’m wrong.

Turns out Forbes.com has a sense of humor.  In fact, they have an entire “Fictional” section of their website.  Fictional lists.  Fictional interviews.  Still in their wheelhouse of jobs and money, but purely imaginary.

Their latest is “The Forbes Fictional 15” — a list of the wealthiest fictional characters, based on info gleaned from the source material and valued against real-world commodity and share price movements.

They update the list every year — how have I missed this — and the 2011 collection includes characters old and new.  For example, Russell Brand’s new version of Arthur Bach came in at #10, but Beverly Hillbilly Jed Clampett is still holding strong at #5.

And who’s Number #1, you ask?

Well, last year’s t0p dog, Dr. Carlisle Cullen, the patriarch of the Twilight film saga, slipped to #2.  (Bella’s getting married; no doubt vampire weddings cost a pretty penny.)  Which means our new number one is an oldie-but-goodie…

Scrooge McDuck, estimated by Forbes.com to have a net worth of $44.1 Billion.

This fictional character biz appears to pay pretty well.  Wonder what ya gotta do to get that gig?

Tweet this

It’s no secret that Conan — and, for that matter, all the late-night talk shows — are taped much earlier in the day.

(Sorry.  I thought you knew.  Oh, and the Easter Bunny?  He’s really Russell Brand.)

Lately Conan has been taking advantage of the early taping by having members of his staff ‘live tweet’ the show during its East Coast air time.

It’s pretty fun.  They open a thread on Twitter, make comments as events unfold on the show, and reply to tweets sent in by viewers.

Last night, Conan himself decided to lead the conversation.  It was quite the event; they announced it hours ahead of time.

Then he live tweeted the show…on Facebook.

Now, I know some people use the two social media interchangeably.  Their tweets post on Facebook and vice versa.  I’ve complained about it before in this space.

But Facebook fans of Team Coco, back me up on this one:  the endless stream of out-of-context one-liners that Conan posted from 11p-12a ET last night didn’t belong on Facebook.

They were tweets, not Facebook status updates.  There is a difference, whether we like to admit it or not.

The Twitter audience is different.  The expectation in language and content is different.  The frequency, for cripes sake, is different.

I know I can hide Team Coco status updates on Facebook, just as I can hide Twitter feeds.  I can also walk away, which is what I chose to do.

I’m just surprised that an entertainer who has been so social media savvy throughout his career — and even more so when his career tanked — would make such an amateur mistake.


Stupor

Is Seth Rogen too ‘goofy’ to play Green Hornet?

Writer Michael Venture posed the question on TodayShow.com.  If you’ve seen any trailers for Green Hornet, you’re probably wondering the same thing.

I didn’t read the comic books as a kid, but I’ve heard enough anecdotally to know his casting is a serious digression.  Seth also co-wrote the film, which appears to take a more lighthearted approach to the source material to better suit his comic persona.

But is ‘goofiness’ really the issue here?  I argue it’s more a question of intellect.

Case in point:  Jonah Hill, who teamed with Russell Brand in the hilarious Get Him to the Greek, is a Seth Rogen-esque film comedian in looks and stature.  Where I believe they differ is their perceived intelligence on screen.

Both can be as silly as all get out, but  Jonah’s characters can be funny and smart.  When Jonah gets out of whatever fix he’s in, it’s believable that he came up with the solution.

Seth, on the other hand, always seems a bit confused and dull-witted.  His humor has a certain charm, but it is defined by his limited mental abilities — a quality which seems to inhabit every character he portrays.

I’m not saying Seth is stupid.  I’m saying he plays stupid….every time.

A goofy Green Hornet is one thing.  But a Green Hornet who is stupid?  Who needs Cato because he can’t figure things out on his own?

Not so super.