Tag Archives: sitcoms

Have a seat

It’s a running gag in television shows and movies —

Dad’s ugly recliner

It often has seen better days, no longer fitting in with Mom’s decorating updates inspired by HGTV. And when Dad sees it, Dad sits in it. And stays.

Oh, the hilarity that the average sitcom has mined from that age-old dynamic. It’s funny ’cause it’s true.

If you remember that chair–or, more tragically, still have that chair sitting in your home and rue the day–perhaps this recliner will help you realize…

Weird-organically-designed-sofa-seat

It could be a lot worse.

Comedy gold

Gary David GoldbergI’m thinking about Gary David Goldberg today.

He died Sunday morning after a long battle with brain cancer.

Of course, when I think of Goldberg, the image at left doesn’t come to mind.

His shows do.

Family Ties.  Spin City.  Michael J. Fox comedies that Goldberg brought to life.

And as much as I loved those sitcoms, I particularly loved the way they signed off.

We even named one of our dogs Ubu.

(He didn’t have the longevity of Goldberg’s career, but he was awfully cute.)

Watercooler moment

Who’s watching The Office finale tonight?

And who’s watching the show for the first time in two years?

the-office-finale-guest-starsI’ll admit it.

When Michael Scott aka Steve Carell left The Office in 2011, I was part of a highly vocal minority — perhaps it was even a majority in some circles — who felt the show should end with his exit.

But the show producers — both in shock that Steve left and in denial that the money train was running out of steam — deluded themselves that they could keep on keepin’ on.

The first season without Steve floundered.  The second  became ‘the farewell season.’  And now that Dunder Mifflin is finally closing its doors, I feel a teeny tiny bit responsible.

Did I show any loyalty after Steve left?  No.

Did I check in from time-to-time to see if my instincts were right that the show would suck without him?  Yes.

Will I watch tonight and wish the show wasn’t being canceled?  No.

Am I hoping Steve Carell shows up somewhere?  Yes.

(It would be the best episode in two years.)

Note — Steve DID appear on the finale.  It was amazeballs.

Momotypes

Everyone loves their Momma on Mother’s Day. And yesterday on Twitter, the tributes were as unique as the women they honored.

But TV moms? Not so much.

They’re all kinda the same. In fact, if you look back at the women who have portrayed moms on TV sitcoms and dramas — at least in my memory — three actresses pop up again and again.

Blythe Danner

Susan Sullivan

Holland Taylor

 

 

 

 

 

All three are currently on the small screen playing moms — Danner on Up All Night, Sullivan on Castle, and Taylor on Two and a Half Men.

Heck, Sullivan even played the mom on one episode of Two and a Half Men before Taylor took over. Viewers probably didn’t even notice the switch.

Which is my point. Do the TV powers-that-be really thing that moms everywhere are fair-haired ladies with bob haircuts?

‘Cause that would be a NO.

Turkey TV

Happy Turkey Day!

I hope you enjoy:

  1. Watching the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade
  2. Cheering on your favorite sports team
  3. Eating yourself into a food coma
  4. Seeing a movie with family and friends
  5. All of the above
  6. None of the above

You can do as much or as little as you like — that’s something to be thankful right there.

And as you consider your entertainment choices, I want to point out one available to you online — a collection of ten of the greatest Thanksgiving episodes from television, comedy and drama.

I found the list on TVSquad.com, and I have to say — they hit the turkey right in the stuffing on this one.  These truly are the greatest Turkey Day TV celebrations of all time — ranked in the correct order, I might add — complete with clips for your viewing pleasure.

Gilmore Girls.  Friends.  Cheers.  Everybody Loves Raymond.  WKRP in Cincinnati. Plus five more.  (It is a list of ten, you know.)  I guarantee you’ll laugh.

And it should clear up any lingering confusion you might have about turkeys flying.

The Late Late Bang

It’s a great day in America!  Why?  Because Craig Ferguson is bringing crossover television back for your viewing pleasure.

At the top of his show last week, Craig appeared in a mini-episode of “The Big Bang Theory” — in true crossover style — and then had the cast take over his show for the rest of the night in a collection of sketches and interviews.

Hilarity ensued.

Thanks, Craig.  We used to depend on television sitcoms and their associated spin-offs for crossover nights.  You know, when Doug from “King of Queens” would appear on “Everybody Loves Raymond” — the show that birthed his series — and vicey versey.

Or remember the night that Paul Reiser’s character on “Mad About You” caused a blackout that affected everyone on “Friends”?  Even though those two series weren’t spin-offs, they did share a common setting — New York City — and the character of Phoebe’s sister, Ursula Buffay, who waited tables at their favorite restaurant.

I guess it makes sense that it would take a show outside of the TV sitcom realm to remind us that crossover television works.  Sitcoms have only recently regained their stronghold on the prime time schedule — thank you, “Modern Family” — and the only spin-offs of late have been the ever redundant “CSI’ and “Law and Order.”

Take a lesson from the Craigy Ferg, programmers everywhere.  Crossover TV is fun.

And it’s great for America!

Big wind

So, I’ve been perusing the celebrity gossip sites today (so you don’t have to), and there’s a new breeze blowing across the land.

Remember how you had to be thin to make it in Hollywood?

Now, you’re pretty much hated if you are.

Take Sarah Jessica Parker.  She’s sporting these muscle-only arms of late…and folks are having a field day.  Not admiring the lack of flab or anything like that.

They are pretty much grossed out.

And then there’s Tina Fey.  She’s been everywhere of late.  “30 Rock” is the sitcom of the moment.  Her movie “Date Night” with Steve Carell won the weekend box office.  She hosted a hilarious episode of “Saturday Night Live.”

She’s also been sexing it up on all her magazine covers and even the photo bumps in Saturday’s SNL.  But people want the frumpy Tina back…not this new, thin, mega-styled, air-brushed version.

Part of me applauds this grassroots call for real women to have real bodies.  Whether or not Hollywood will respond is another thing altogether.

But I have to wonder: would any of these people calling for normalcy — if placed in the same position — be able to resist becoming a bit plastic themselves?

Heck, if I achieved stardom — if money was no object — I’m pretty sure I would find it hard to resist a bit of de-frumping.

Who am I kidding?  I wouldn’t even put up a fight.