Tag Archives: writer

I’m no genius

I thought I had read Thomas Wolfe, but it turns out I haven’t.

That didn’t stop me from going to see the movie Genius, which details the publication of Wolfe’s first two novels,  and his relationship with his editor Max Perkins.

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Jude Law’s Wolfe is a loud, melodramatic Southerner, self-involved yet low in self-esteem.  Colin Firth as Perkins is his solid, steady opposite,  the voice of reason who, despite his better judgment, is drawn to Wolfe’s charm and bravado.

I expected the movie to focus on their editorial process,  and it does. But instead of passing any judgments on Wolfe as a writer,  it celebrates their relationship – –  more like a father and son than editor and writer.

Both of their families suffered at times from their single-mindedness, but no one more than Wolfe himself.

I now have Wolfe’s first book Look Homeward, Angel on hold at the library. I suppose I was charmed as well.

Drama mama update

Since my post last night, my friend Wendy Molyneux (who also happens to be a writer for Bob’s Burgers) has, as of 3pm ET today, raised almost $8,800 for CureSearch.

Because she hates Entourage and really does not want to see the movie.  And hates pediatric cancers even more.

drama mama pjsTo up the ante, she has promised to wear this lovely ‘drama mama’ pajama ensemble to the theater if she raises her goal of $10,000 by midnight tonight PT. She’ll also likely tweet her agony to the masses, and that will be hilarious.

So give if you can.  We both appreciate it.

Update to the update:

We did it!  Wendy has already well-surpassed her $10,000 goal!  But she is giving you new reasons to give (besides the obvious to help fight cancer).  Here is her latest post:

Well, this has not worked out very well. Thanks to all of the terrible people I know and a bunch of awful strangers I’ve NEVER EVEN MET WHO CARE ABOUT CHILDREN’S CANCER, I’ve reached 10K in one day. If this madness continues, I am going to have to drink movie soda out of a Turtle sipper my effing sister made (if this hits 15K),  AND if for some reason this goes on all the way to 20K I am going to have to see this movie twice. TWICE. This is a mess. All I know is this nightmare will end on June 3rd when Entourage premieres and the world as we know it ends. Screw all of you and your goddamned BIG HEARTS. You are the worst.

Told you she was hilarious.

Overbooked

I was very excited to attend today BookCon at Javits Center, the publishing conference for us non-industry folk.

BEA_BookCon490

The organizers had put together a great schedule of panel discussions, author appearances and book signings, and had even created a designated BookCon show floor separate from the BEA Expo, the industry event that has been going on all week.

But then they oversold it. A lot, a lot.

There were so many people trying to get into the show that security had to limit the people who could enter each half hour.  People (like me) missed events because they weren’t allowed in due to traffic congestion.

bookconOnce I finally was inside, every session I wanted to attend was either already over, closed to additional participants, or had a two-hour line that snaked around Javits and back.

The feed on the BookCon app was filled with derogatory comments from disappointed fans, many of whom had traveled hours to attend.  I realized fairly quickly that we had all been ‘conned’ and left.

Manhattan was right outside, and can be fairly entertaining.

 

Might I suggest ‘drop?’

When I was a humor editor at Hallmark Cards back in the day, part of my job was to read greeting card copy and look for any possible innuendo.

Was it dirty or gross? Could people take it wrong? Especially it if was unintentional, it was my job to suss it out.

dump cakeApparently the writers of these cookbooks don’t think that way.

“Dump” to them only has the one meaning…to ‘drop heavily or suddenly,’ which appears to be their intent.

But every time the infomercial airs — and it airs a lot —

I’m afraid a very different and unappetizing meaning for ‘dump’ comes to mind.

Sorry, Cathy.  I’m ordering takeout.

Might I suggest…

By now you all know that His Royal Highness has been born to William and Kate. His name, though, they say “may take some time.” Don’t worry —

I’m all over it.

Sebastian

call me whatIt’s a worthy name; the Greek translation is “venerable.” It began to be widely used in the third century after it was the name of  a Christian martyr…so it’s certainly manly enough.

Sebastian also has British ties. It’s in the Top 100 list of boy’s names. Sebastian Cabot is a British actor; Sebastian Faulks, a British writer. And there are characters named Sebastian in popular British fiction, including Sherlock Holmes and Brideshead Revisited.

Most importantly, I like it.

Look, I’m only trying to expedite the process.  Princess Diana and Prince Charles took seven days to name William; William and Kate took three weeks to name their dog, Lupo; and Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip took a month to name Charles.

Let’s not give the child an identity crisis!

Playing in the dirt

Anyone who has owned a car has probably had this happen at one time or another…

wash meEveryone’s a critic.

But whereas the writers obviously have high standards for car cleanliness, car owners have never had high expectations in the presentation of the graffiti.

Oh, but we should.

‘Dirt Art’ is a thing…an amazing thing.  Some of the examples out there on the Internet will blow your mind.

dog poker dirt artbridge dirt art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Right?

Now, I don’t have a car here in Manhattan, but if I did…

Complaints would really have to bring their A game.

Spirit stick

Do you remember the very first DVD you ever owned?

I do.

I had just bought a combo VHS/DVD player — back when they were still pretty pricey — and a friend gave me the campy cheerleader cult classic Bring it On.  (It wasn’t a classic back then; just campy.)

It also wasn’t a musical, but it is now, and not on Broadway. My west coast friends have the bragging rights to this one.

Bring it On: The Musical may be playing at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles through December 10th, but they have recruited a bunch of Broadway award-winners to their team:

  • Tony Award-winning writer Jeff Whitty (Avenue Q)
  • Tony Award-winning composer Lin-Manuel Miranda (In The Heights)
  • Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning composer Tom Kitt (Next to Normal)
  • Tony Award-winning director/choreographer Andy Blankenbuehler (In The Heights)

It’s gotta be good, right?

Tweets from audience members, both celebrity and ‘regular folk,’ have been very enthusiastic. The critics appear to have their doubts.

But it’s early yet.  There’s lots of time to polish.  Bring it On: The Musical is on a national tour, although no Broadway dates appear to be scheduled.

Yet.

I’m sexy, I’m cute,
I’m popular to boot.
I’m wanted, I’m hot,
I’m everything you’re not,
I’m pretty, I’m cool,
I dominate this school,
Who am I? Just guess,
Guys wanna touch my chest,
We cheer and we lead,
We act like we’re on speed,
Hate us ’cause we’re beautiful,
Well we don’t like you either,
We’re cheerleaders,
We are cheerleaders.

There was an old man…

Happy Limerick Day!

We celebrate Limerick Day every May 12th in honor of Edward Lear, the English writer who is credited with making the art form popular.

In other words, for making every Tom, Dick and Harry think they can write poetry — way to go, Eddie!

In honor of the big day, I wrote a rather lame limerick myself:

My plane from Dallas was late
Yesterday would be the date
So today I am groggy
My head coarse and foggy
And my blog?  Well…it’s not so great.

See?  This is the type of ‘poetry’ that Edward unleashed on the world.  Of course, his wasn’t that great either.  Take a read:

There was an Old Man in a tree,
Who was horribly bored by a Bee;
When they said, ‘Does it buzz?’
He replied, ‘Yes, it does!’
‘It’s a regular brute of a Bee!’

I mean, come on — he used ‘bee’ twice in the rhyme scheme.

Amateur.

Oscar unworthy

I’m headed to Los Angeles this weekend — for work,  of course.  But my hotel is located right next door to the Grammy Awards venue.

I know, right?

Another red carpet, another round of celebrity self-congratulations.  And as the Academy Awards draw ever nearer, I have to say — this year’s awards season seems even more shallow than usual.  The nominees, the producers, the directors, and even the Oscar voters, I dare say, have abandoned even the appearance of giving out the statutes based on quality.

You just gotta be popular.

Producers always run elaborate pre-Oscar marketing campaigns for movies and their stars, but this year, even the actors are purchasing full-page ads in industry publications ‘for your consideration.’

Case in point: Melissa Leo, Best Supporting Actress nominee for her gritty performance in  “The Fighter,” (which has already garnered her three other trophies).

Chillax, Melissa.  You’ve been considered.  And shee-shee pics like these may swing opinion in the other direction.

The popularity of  the leading actors in The King’s Speech is also one of the main reasons it has of late pulled ahead of The Social Network in the awards race — not because Speech is a better film.  (It’s not.)  This became especially clear during the SAG Awards telecast.

When the casts of both movies appeared on stage during the show, the good feelings that washed over the cast of The King’s Speech were palpable…. whereas the young entourage from The Social Network was prickly, awkward and off-putting.

Heck, I wanted TSN to win, and I didn’t like their attitude that night much either.  But I would hope — if I had the opportunity to vote for any of the awards — that I could separate my personal feelings about any of the nominees from their work in the films.

If the Oscars are going to mean anything now and in the future, the voting community has to man up, act like adults and vote based on the quality of the filmmaking…not just ‘who’s their buddy.’

But then again, maybe none of them are that good of actors.

It’s a long story

Should women of a ‘certain age’ have long hair?

I say yes.

So does Dominique Browning.  She’s a writer and former editor-in-chief of House and Garden.  At the age of 55, she’s sporting a rather impressive mane of long gray hair that reaches half-way down her back.

That mane has gotten her a lot of flack from her family, friends, and professional colleagues, and in a recent New York Times article, she posed possible reasons why.

She’s acting out.  Living in the 70’s.  Being high maintenance.  Trying to attract the fellas.  And she gladly owns up to all of them.

While I understand part of the issue really lies with her friends and family — anytime someone doesn’t conform, we question our own decisions —  I have to wonder why longer hair isn’t more popular with women in their middle years in the first place.

I understand why they cut their hair when they have children.  It’s easier to maintain short, and it keeps it out of reach of sticky, eager baby fingers.

It makes perfect sense.

But once the kids are older, and your skin starts to age and sag a bit, isn’t longer hair a nice distraction from the passing years?  I’m not suggesting you hide behind your hair…just give people something else pretty to gaze upon.

We do it all the time with clothing and jewelry.  Isn’t hair just another way to accessorize our look?